Blog

Four women seated and talking and taking notes around a round table with a sign labeled "Loud Proud and Passionate, disabled women as leaders in inclusive development"

Full Circle Access at Gender 360 Summit

By Ashley Holben, Program Specialist

How do you get people with disabilities to the table? And is simply getting them to that proverbial table enough? What's the next step?

These are some of the questions we were thinking about when, for the first time (hopefully the first of many!), MIUSA had the opportunity to attend the Gender 360 Summit hosted by FHI 360, a member of MIUSA's EDDI initiative.

Three young women stand on a high ledge facing out towards the view

Re-Defining the “Success” Story

International exchange is one of those experiences that can have high stakes for someone with a disability.

A disabled exchange participant might invest so much energy convincing others that nothing bad will happen if they go abroad, that it stings that much worse if an accident does occur. Worse still, even a minor incident might result in a program to question the participant’s abilities or to project doubts on future participants with disabilities.

Wheelchair user with pigeons and small child in background

Finding the Bright Spots

In the next decades, I hope we look at students who experienced these barriers and found ways to go abroad anyways. These alumni hold the solutions, which may be replicable for others. They showed barriers can be negligible when we focus on the how.

Susan speaks to a group of disabled women sitting in a circle

Infiltration is the New Inclusion

Let’s face it: inclusion is taking waaay too long!

So what can we do?

I believe now’s the time to adopt a strategy of moving from inclusion to infiltration.

During a session at the recent InterAction Forum in Washington, D.C. (an annual event bringing together leaders from the international development field), I presented the idea of infiltration in the context of people with disabilities not waiting for life-saving programs to include them.

Justin standing with work colleagues in front of brick wall outside.

Reflecting on my #LifeAfterExchange

It has been about six years since I returned home from my last international exchange. I spent the academic year of 2010-2011 studying Spanish literature and Latin American history at the Pontifical Catholic University in Santiago Chile. Since then I have been wondering just what it was about my exchange that gave my employment prospects such a boost. We recently launched the Clearinghouse's #LifeAfterExchange campaign looking at the long-term benefits of international exchange, so this seemed like a good time for further exploration.

Close up of collage of old travel photos featuring people with disabilities plus a souvenir globe and flag

6 Signs that It's Been Too Long Since Your International Exchange

You could be one of them if:

  1. Your photographs were captured on film. Actual film! That you had to get developed!

  2. Your travel tales went un-chronicled on Instagram and Tumblr in favor of travel journals, postcards, and emails to friends (made on Hotmail or AOL accounts).

  3. You want to re-connect with your overseas friends and host family, but you’re going to have to do some major detective work in order to track down their contact info.

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