Demanding Change in India

WILD women and resource people holding their hands in the air
With the momentum of WILD energizing her, a disabled leader set to work in making change happen for women and girls in India.

Never underestimate the power of disabled women.

Especially when they’re WILD women fighting their way to the forefront of the social debates, strategic planning sessions, and discussions about ending violence, illiteracy, unemployment, poverty, and inaccessible health services.

When Rosy Sujatha Kulandai boarded a plane in Chennai, India, she embarked on a transformational journey with determination. Determination to travel to Eugene, Oregon, USA to meet 20 other women leaders with disabilities from various countries and cultures, and to develop specific plans and strategies to accomplish the goals of her organization.

“Though my work experience addresses some of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG). I would like to focus more on the 3rd and 6th MDG’s – to promote gender equality and empowerment and combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases with more thrust to disabled population.”

Rosy maintained this fierce focus and determination throughout MIUSA’s 7th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD); from addressing major issues of discrimination with policy makers to revolutionizing the image of beauty at a city fashion show.

She took away from each activity and session a strong resolve to return to Chennai and implement the many ideas for change stirred during the 3-week program.

Upon arrival back to India, Rosy allowed herself a two-day rest before delving back into her work. With the momentum of WILD inspiring and energizing her, she contacted two NGOs; one which works exclusively for people with disabilities and the other a general developmental organization, which has a few programs for people with disabilities.

“I shared about my experience in WILD. They showed interest in listening to me and have also extended their invitation to me for being a Resource Person for their future training.”

Before attending the WILD program, Rosy worked to make change happen for women and girls with disabilities. Now that she’s back home, she demands change happen now.

Learn more about the impact of WILD under the Related Resources section.