Resource Library

Personal Story
Erikson with students and faculty at the School for the Deaf

Teaching a World Away

One day while teaching as usual, I noticed new parents appeared with their Deaf daughter. After my colleagues and I met with the parents, I was shocked to discover that their daughter never had been to school or learned sign language. Instead, she stayed at home and worked on the farm. She was already 18 years old. It was heartbreaking for me.

Personal Story
Group photo with Francis and three friends

In Search of a Different Career Path

Sitting in class with Deaf peers and a teacher signing in American Sign Language, I realized how fortunate I was to be at Ohlone College in Fremont, California.

There, I studied English and Math, made friends with Deaf international and American students, learned from signing instructors, and played on the college soccer team. What would I have done had I not come to the United States? When I finished high school in Zambia, I likely would have lived with a friend and tried finding odd jobs to get by.

Personal Story
Manako and other Deaf classmates stand in front of the school for the Deaf in Jamaica

Embracing Deaf Identity Through Education

Since I was seven years old, I dreamed of studying at a university in America.

I was born in Iwate, Japan, but when my family learned I was Deaf, we moved to Tokyo, which has more resources for Deaf education. At seven years old, my family then moved to Atlanta, Georgia, where I attended a Japanese school for two years.

While living in Atlanta, I was privileged to meet Ms. Heather Whitestone, who was the first Deaf winner of the Miss America Pageant in 1995. She was my first Deaf role model, and she inspired me with her message of “Deaf can do it.”

Personal Story
View of the Arc de Triomphe on a bright day

Tracing the Steps of a Deaf Leader through France

As a teacher at the Wisconsin School for the Deaf, my students started a project to assist their peers who struggle with reading. Although my students are fluent English readers, the vast majority of the school’s freshmen students are English Language Learners who cannot read at the 9th grade level, which makes novels used for course curricula inaccessible to them.

Personal Story
Old castle with courtyard in Siena, Italy. Photo Credit: "Castello di Belcaro, giardino 01" by Sailko. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

International Journeys in Deaf Culture

His travels for foreign language study have landed him in Greece, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, France, England and Scotland, where he’s been able to communicate directly with Deaf Europeans about their experiences. Steven is Deaf, has partial vision loss and uses a cochlear implant for access.

Personal Story
Mallory stands with two of the Deaf Mexican students she worked with.

Learning from Teaching Deaf Students Abroad

While pursuing her Master’s degree in Deaf Education at the University of Arizona, Mallory Watts sought an opportunity to expand her professional knowledge by teaching abroad.

Personal Story
Loren stands next to a gondola operator during an excursion in Venice.

Cross-Cultural Communication Challenges

With an interest in learning about the cultural, political, and food differences between France and the United States, Loren Ashton embarked on semester-long study abroad to Aix-en-Provence, France, where she attended the Institute of American Universities. Loren, who is Deaf, had the added chance to learn about another aspect of French culture, Deaf French culture. In doing so, Loren built pride in her sign language and new cross-cultural communication skills.

Personal Story
Christine throws a ball to a young girl who is waiting to bat

Becoming a Global Citizen

For Christine Bélanger and her fellow volunteers, living with, working alongside, and learning from the local people and leaders of the host community in Guatemala elevated their experience from travel to citizen diplomacy exchange.

Personal Story
Maegan poses for a photo between two large rocks.

Speaking Out Against Injustice

Maegan, who is Deaf, lives by her principle of speaking out against injustices. Her first experience abroad opened up her eyes to international disability advocacy, a field that she’s dedicated herself to ever since.

Tipsheet
A young woman using a manual wheelchair hangs onto the back of a young man's power wheelchair as he pulls her along a street.

Disability-Focused International Exchanges

As a person with a disability, you have the right to participate in the same international exchange opportunities as people who do not have disabilities. You may decide that you want to participate in an exchange program that is not specifically focused on the topic of disability, such as one focused on Japanese culture, public health, or the performing arts.

Tipsheet
Student wearing a hearing aid writing in a classroom with other students.

English Testing for High School Students with Disabilities

Before they arrive in the U.S. for a life-changing cultural immersion experience, prospective high school exchange students from around the world are expected to demonstrate their level of English ability, usually by taking a standardized test. Whichever test you use to assess your applicants, learn how to adapt it to fairly and accurately measure the skills of students with disabilities.

Personal Story
Samson, wearing a bright orange shirt, poses for a picture in front of a bridge.

A Great Privilege Becomes a Calling to Uplift Others

With an interest in science and a passion for universal education, Samson Ndindiriyimana earned a scholarship from the government of Rwanda to continue his undergraduate studies in physics at Hendrix College in the United States. Samson, who is Deaf, dreams of becoming a civil engineer.

Tipsheet
Annie who is hard of hearing volunteered in Ghana

Deaf & Hard of Hearing Participants in International Exchange

The experience of being in a completely new environment, disability or not, can be very challenging. As a Deaf or Hard of Hearing person, these new environments may present communication challenges that you haven’t experienced before.

Tipsheet
Two young women are signing to each other while smiling.

Deaf International Exchange Opportunities

As a Deaf/Hard of Hearing individual, you have the right to apply to and participate in any type of international exchange program that fits your interests and goals! Exchange program providers and universities have worked with many participants to arrange sign language interpreters abroad, real-time captioning, CART and other technologies. If you are specifically interested in focusing on Deaf/Hard of Hearing issues or learning alongside other members of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing community, read on to learn about opportunities that might interest you.

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