Resource Library

Personal Story
Juanita Lillie with other program participants under waterfalls in rockclimbing gear

Encouraging Others to See the World

To escape Michigan's cold winter, Juanita Lillie, who is blind, sought Spanish immersion in Central America, where she found warmth not only from the sunshine, but from classmates, professors, and the community.

Best Practice
Student smiling in a field of flowers.

Area Coordinator Reflects on Placing a Student with a Disability

When Annie Reifsnyder became an Area Coordinator for CCI Greenheart, a non-profit organization that places international high school exchange students in the United States, she found a way to connect with students from around the world.

One Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) student from Russia in particular caught her attention. “I received Natasha’s bio and was kind of enamored by it,” Reifsnyder says. “I just thought how neat, how cool, how amazing, obviously a student who wanted to come to the U.S., but one who is blind.”

Tipsheet
Hand of someone reading braille on the edge of a public bus posted schedule

An Overview of Braille around the World

You need to access the same information as everyone else who is on your exchange program or when navigating your new adventures overseas. The differences from home may mean you need to learn contracted Braille or specialized symbols specific to a foreign language.

Tipsheet
African exchange participant touching a tactile wall while visiting FDR Memorial in Washington DC

How to Be Independent in the U.S. as a Blind Visitor

If you are blind or low vision, you will find Americans friendly and helpful but also may be confronted with U.S. expectations that you learn to navigate and live independently in your daily life. U.S. laws and community resources create opportunities to support your independence.

Tipsheet
Two people who are looking to use a CCTV

Assistive Technology for Blind or Low Vision Participants

What technology is preferred or needed depends on previous training or the type and amount of visual content that is being accessed. Computer proficiency is expected for a variety of tasks, and by using adaptive software, such as audio screen-readers, standard computers can be made much more accessible. Accessing books and other printed materials in an accessible format also can be done using braille-related technology or magnifying equipment, some of which are portable.

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