Resource Library

Tipsheet
An assortment of foreign currencies are scattered on a table.

SSI, SSDI & International Exchange

As you investigate all funding possibilities, be sure to keep in mind any income or benefits that you are currently receiving in the U.S. There’s a possibility you may be able to use these towards your international exchange opportunity.

"While preparing to study abroad in England, I was concerned about how much it was going to cost. I was receiving SSI benefits and involved with the Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS), and remained eligible for the year I was in England." - Beth Ocrant, who has a vision disability

Tipsheet
Wheelchair lift in a chartered bus overseas

Finding the Funding to Meet Obligations

Many best practices for including people with disabilities start with making sure funds are available for disability-related accommodations in the international exchange program.

Tipsheet
An assortment of foreign currencies are scattered on a table.

Plan Your Expenses

Let's get started by building a list of potential expenses you may have when participating in an international exchange experience. From general fees to disability-related expenses. These expenses might be paid for in a number of ways, including through your own expenses, a school, an exchange program, vocational rehabilitation funding, scholarships, and more.

Tipsheet
A blind man sits near a flower-filled landscape.

List of Funded Exchange Programs to the U.S.

Whether you're interested in leadership experience, disability issues, or other topics, consider applying for one of these competitive programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and other organizations. Most programs include full or partial funding!

Best Practice
In a classroom setting, a Deaf man leads a group of other individuals with different types of disabilities in learning different signs.

Sending a Deaf Student Abroad: One University’s Experience

Disability services offices across the country are asking themselves whether or not to provide accommodations for Deaf and hard of hearing students who hope to travel abroad through educational exchange programs. For the Disability Resource Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), the question was not whether to provide overseas accommodations, but how.

Tipsheet
Group of colleagues in discussion

Costs & Legal Obligations

Many exchange advisors assume that accommodating people with disabilities in their programs will be prohibitively expensive. In fact, many accommodations are cost-free or quite inexpensive. The key to finding low-cost solutions is to foster open communication with the exchange participant and to think broadly about the possibilities and resources available to the organization and the participant.

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