Resource Library

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Students interact with assistive technology for people who are blind or low vision.

FLEX, YES and YEAR Programs

International high school and university exchange students with diverse disabilities travel to Eugene, Oregon each July and August, for an orientation prior to the start of their academic year in host communities across the United States. The students are all recipients of prestigious scholarships from the U.S.

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infographic of 3 circular images: 1) 3 students sitting at their desks arranged in a circle, 2) hand writing on a piece of paper with pencil, 3) 2 people speaking face to face.

Infographic: No-Cost Universal Design Examples

No-Cost! Universal Design Examples to Increase Access to Language Learning

From gathering information, to expressing ideas, and staying engaged – individuals learn in various ways.

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Illustrated collage of world landmark postage stamps and luggage tags with text: "Where do US citizens want to go? Where do international visitors to the US come from? Everywhere!" with list of world regions

Infographic: Ask NCDE!

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by Mobility International USA, NCDE is your free resource to start you on your journey. Get to know us!

Tip: Download the accessible infographic under Documents or view on Flickr.

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Young American man in the distance looking at some livestock in Norway

Including Exchange Participants with Traumatic Brain Injuries

In the right situation with the right supports, an individual with a traumatic brain injury can increase the boundaries of their potential while recovering abilities and a sense of identity.

A traumatic brain injury (TBI), in contrast to an intellectual disability or learning disability, is acquired through a blow or jolt to the head causing a disruption in brain function. It can involve reduced capacity in cognitive, sensory, physical, or psychosocial abilities, which previously might have been easy for the individual. 

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Students sit at desks with teacher in front of board

Teaching Languages to Blind and Visually Impaired Students

Most language course work focuses on visual input as the main tool for teaching language. Students practice vocabulary by identifying pictures in the target language. Cultural curriculum focuses on the visual arts or landscapes. Exams ask students to match categories in corresponding lists.

Blind or visually impaired people benefit from language study in the same way as sighted students, but there are some key differences in the way that they learn. A multisensory approach to language teaching can help shift to a more inclusive environment.

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A young man wearing a blazer stands mid-presentation before a screen with "Generation Study Abroad" projected onto it. Two women are seated next to him.

Presentation Slides on Disability and Study Abroad

If you attend conferences or host events related either to the disability community or study abroad field, why not bring the topic of people with disabilities going abroad into the fore? Let us get you started with Powerpoint slides ready to insert into your next presentation.

The slides cover:

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Students with Disabilities, by Program and Disability Type

YES Students with Disabilities by Disability Type (2007-2016), as shown on a pie chart.

44% Deaf/HOH
35% Blind/Low Vision
19% Physical Disability 
20% Non-apparent 

FLEX Students with Disabilities by Disability Type (2007-2016), as shown on a pie chart.

59% Physical Disability 
8% Deaf/HOH
4% Non-apparent 
29% Blind/Low Vision

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FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities Combined, by Disability Type

Total Number of Students by Disability Type (2007-2016)

  • 40% Physical Disability 
  • 32% Blind/ Low Vision 
  • 25% Deaf/HOH
  • 2% Non-apparent

Students with Physical Disabilities

  • 37% Cerebral Palsy 
  • 11% Scoliosis 
  • 7% Short Stature 
  • 8% Amputee 
  • 3% Spina Bifida 
  • 1% Polio 
  • 1% Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 
  • 32% Other 
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Specialized vs. Mainstream School Placements

Percent of Deaf or Blind Students Placed at Specialized Schools vs. Mainstream Schools (2007-2016)

Illustrated by highlighted symbols of students and a schoolhouse

  • 50% of students who are Deaf are placed at specialized schools vs. in mainstream public schools 
  • 25% of students who are blind are placed at specialized schools vs. in mainstream public schools
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A portion of an infographic highlighting total percentage of FLEX and YES students by disability type.

Infographics: Disability Inclusion in the FLEX and YES Programs, 2007-2016

The Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) and Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) programs are competitive, merit-based scholarship programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

Over the last ten years, more than 250 students with disabilities from 37 countries have participated these life-changing youth programs.

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FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities, 2007-2016

A line graph showing the total number of FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities, by Year, 2007-2016

Number of FLEX Students with Disabilities, by Year

  • 2007 = 16

  • 2008 = 14

  • 2009 = 12

  • 2010 = 12

  • 2011 = 12

  • 2012 = 14

  • 2013 = 9

  • 2014 = 20

  • 2015 = 11

  • 2016 = 14

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