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A portion of an infographic highlighting total percentage of FLEX and YES students by disability type.

Infographics: Disability Inclusion in the FLEX and YES Programs, 2007-2016

The Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) and Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) programs are competitive, merit-based scholarship programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

Over the last ten years, more than 250 students with disabilities from 37 countries have participated these life-changing youth programs.

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FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities, 2007-2016

A line graph showing the total number of FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities, by Year, 2007-2016

Number of FLEX Students with Disabilities, by Year

  • 2007 = 16

  • 2008 = 14

  • 2009 = 12

  • 2010 = 12

  • 2011 = 12

  • 2012 = 14

  • 2013 = 9

  • 2014 = 20

  • 2015 = 11

  • 2016 = 14

Tipsheet
An international student from Asia in a power wheelchair wears a graduation cap and gown as he accepts his diploma.

Study at a U.S. College or University

On any campus, you are likely to find students, staff, and faculty with disabilities studying, working, and teaching alongside people without disabilities. Imagine yourself among them, then begin your path to U.S. study today!

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3 people, one in a scooter talking

What Statistics Tell Us about People with Disabilities in International Exchange

Mobility International USA is always looking for surveys or research in the disability or international education fields that have the potential to shine a light on the participation and experiences of people with disabilities in international exchange. If surveys ask both "Do you have a disability?" and "Did you [study, volunteer, intern, teach, research] abroad?," then we do our best to request and report on the data, so we can all learn more from the findings.

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four young people smiling

How to Welcome Staff and Interns with Disabilities to Your International Education Organization

Here, we asked people with disabilities to share their tips for what international education organizations can do to fill jobs, internships, or practicum positions with talented professionals and interns with disabilities. You might notice that many of these tips also apply to including people with disabilities as participants in your international exchange programs!

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2 women smilling, wearing professional attire

People with Disabilities Needed in International Education Careers

As part of our ongoing work on the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange (NCDE) project, we reach out to professionals in the international exchange field - from study abroad advisors to program administrators to faculty leaders - to broaden their understanding of disability inclusion and access and how it can increase the diversity of their participants.

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Group of students standing and some sitting on table working together.

Supporting Exchange Participants with Bulimia or Anorexia

An international exchange program can involve a change in nutritional routines, causing symtoms of Bulimia and Anorexia to develop or to spin out of control. It is possible though for participants with Bulimia or Anorexia to successfully complete international exchange, whether they come into the program with a diagnosed condition or if they develop symptoms after departure.

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EducationUSA website snapshot that says "For International Students: U.S. Study Opportunities Abound"

EducationUSA: Your Official Source for U.S. Higher Education

EducationUSA Advisers around the world offer information, orientation, and guidance as you search for higher education institutions in the United States that fits your needs. EducationUSA makes applying to a U.S. college or university clear.

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International student rides down a ramp using her wheelchair in front of the "International House Cafe".

7 Steps for #Access2USA

Step 1: Start Looking!

Remember that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) gives you the right to access educational programs offered on U.S. soil, so find an opportunity that fits your interest.

Step 2: Apply!

You have the right to an accessible application and admission process, if needed.  Many programs will allow you access to an advisor who will provide assistance.

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foreign currency

How to Fund an Experience of a Lifetime

You’re probably thinking, “Wait, I have to pay to volunteer or work abroad?” It may seem counterintuitive, but keep in mind that there are significant costs for programs to send, train, and support participants abroad. Typically, U.S. sending organizations, participants, and host country partners work together to share these costs.

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