Resource Library

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Young girl transfered from wheelchair to bedroom desk to study

Wheelchair Access in Lodging

The living situation for an exchange participant is not just a place to stay, but a way to learn about family, culture and language. Some participants will be better suited to living in a dormitory, while others will thrive in a homestay family. In either case, what's key is finding a place and people who will welcome a participant with a disability into many aspects of life in the new country.

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Youth Exchange participants with disabilities try square dancing

Online Resources to Get Started

The U.S. Department of State offers study abroad scholarship opportunities for American high students and strives to represent the diversity of the United States, including persons with disabilities, in all exchange programs. Each year, almost 2,000 U.S. Department of State-sponsored exchange students from over 50 countries, all of whom have undergone a competitive, merit-based selection process, spend the academic year in communities across the United States. Exchange students can help bring the world into your home and community.

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Looking at laptop

#ChangeExchange Infographic

Youth represent our next generation of thought leaders, scientists, politicians, and teachers. Our world needs their full engagement as global citizens. But, are we reaching everyone?

Are you a visual learner? Download the designed PDF of this infographic to fully see these statistics and characteristics. Find it under Documents.

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Young foreign student with mobility disability talks with an advisor

Knowing What Disability Questions to Ask: Sample Accommodations Forms

Are you advising someone with a disability who is traveling abroad for your volunteer, study or professional program? Do you know what questions to ask to assist them in preparing for travel and living abroad related to their disability?

These access information forms provide starting points to learn more about what may be needed. The advisor guidelines also help know what the individual's responses may mean and what follow-up questions you could ask. Download and adapt these for your own use; it may mean asking fewer questions on the forms and more in face to face conversations.

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Pie chart with data below on First-Year International Students

The Numbers Tell the Story Infographic

You are not imagining it! The majority of disabled international students who arrive on U.S. campuses, and Americans with disabilities who study abroad, have non-apparent disabilities. Download this infographic to learn other characteristics and statistics about this population.

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Austin Bates (left) who has diabetes with other diverse volunteers in Peru

How To Prepare for Diversity

Do you know what to put in place at your program site to be best prepared? Can you match up the list of disabilities with the list of program accommodations? View the accessible PDF under Documents  for a designed version of the lists.

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Dealing with Doubts

Alyssa Hillary, an Autistic student blogging about her study abroad experience in China, is having a successful time but the initial reaction from the overseas university would have made one think that was not possible.

“[Chinese administrators] said people like me shouldn’t go to college, and they tried to get the program to un-accept me, and they tried to have me sent home.”

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Two professionals are meeting

Current Trends

Are you trending up or down with these changes that long-established education abroad programs are spearheading and other types of international exchanges could tap into?

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Hands giving thumbs up and thumbs down

DOs and DON'Ts of Fundraising

DOs

Convey courtesy and respect.

Remember to say “thank you” throughout the process of requesting funds, even if a potential donor can’t offer funds.

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Hands on braille keyboard

Quick Tips for Accessible Web Forms

Address common accessibility issues by designing your web forms and documents to be accessible from the start! To check out how a webpage would be read to a blind individual using a screenreader, download the Fangs Screen Reader Emulator, a Firefox plugin. To try using a real screen reader, download NVDA for Windows.

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A group of women and men on laptops

Seven Steps for Setting Up an Accessible Virtual Exchange

  1. Know your toolbox. Many e-learning platforms and tools that are popular for virtual exchanges come equipped with various accessibility features, such as tools for embedding captions, screenreading compatibility, or keyboard navigation. Research which accessibility features are included in your platform of choice. If it offers little in the way of accessibility, either think through alternative methods for providing access or use a different platform.
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A young woman types on a computer with projector screens.

Legal Trends for Accessible Media

What an age we live in! Advances in technology have made it possible for us to learn, work, innovate, network, and be entertained in ways that weren't possible not so long ago. With the support of the following U.S. laws and policies, people with disabilities can be full and active participants - not just spectators - in the age of exciting new technologies, especially those that bring people together virtually.

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A teenage boy uses sign language with a person on a computer screen.

Accessible Virtual Exchanges

Virtual exchanges are growing more popular for sharing information and ideas across international borders. There is no precise formula to virtual exchanges, but they typically take the form of online cross-cultural courses between individuals, between classrooms, or between institutions around the world. Educational activities and dialogues may draw from video, audio, text, and social media.

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Money spills out of a jar labeled "My travel fund"

Fundraising 101

You can build a community of support through fundraising, especially when it comes to opportunities that will advance your personal and professional goals. Family members, friends, teachers, local businesses and nonprofits can all work with you to help make your dream a reality. Kick off your fundraising efforts with these ideas.

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