Resource Library

Tipsheet
Money spills out of a jar labeled "My travel fund"

Fundraising 101

You can build a community of support through fundraising, especially when it comes to opportunities that will advance your personal and professional goals. Family members, friends, teachers, local businesses and nonprofits can all work with you to help make your dream a reality. Kick off your fundraising efforts with these ideas.

Tipsheet
Money in a padlock

How to Choose a Budget-Friendly Exchange Program

Research the cost of living in cities worldwide.

Depending on the exchange rate, you may want to select a location where the rate works in your favor. In general, towns and small cities are usually more affordable than large cities.

Consider going to non-traditional locations.

Costs for programs in Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, or Southeast Asia are often lower than in Western Europe, Japan and Australia. And, even better, studying in these locations may also increase your chances of getting a scholarship!

Tipsheet
Exchange staff smiles with blind youth

High School Exchange Programs at the U.S. State Department

The full participation of youth with disabilities in international exchange is a critical step in increasing independent living skills, accessing post-secondary education opportunities, and pursuing competitive employment. International exchange also provides an understanding and respect for other peoples and cultures, cross-cultural competencies, including foreign language proficiency, and a true global perspective.

Tipsheet
Pushing woman in wheelchair up a ramp.

How Will I Pay for Personal Assistance Abroad?

The costs of international travel for just one person - whether for airfare, housing, or all the tasty local food - are harrowing enough. So if you're someone who will require the services of a personal assistant during your international exchange experience, the idea of doubling or even tripling these expenses can make it seem like international travel is out of reach.

Not so! For affordable PAS abroad, look for creative ways to reduce or share costs, raise funds, or negotiate with your exchange program provider to help defray the costs.

Tipsheet
A woman is carried up stairs on someone's back, while others bring her wheelchair.

Setting Clear Expectations for Personal Assistants

Simply being available to travel wasn't enough to meet U.S. student Lauren Presutti's criteria for providing personal assistance during her studies abroad to Australia. "It was crucial for me to find the right two people who I felt most comfortable with and who I could completely trust," says Lauren of what made her time abroad a success.

Promoting a sense of trust and confidence between you and your personal assistant (PA) begins with establishing clear roles and responsibilities for what is expected of each other while you're abroad. Begin now.

Tipsheet
Woman in wheelchair gets a push from a friend.

Will I Need Personal Assistance Services Abroad?

There are many unknowns when preparing for an exchange experience in another country, especially when it comes to figuring out how you'll get what you need to be independent. Getting from place to place, taking care of yourself, and getting assistance when needed are all part of the equation.

Not sure whether you will need personal assistance services (PAS) during your international experience or not? Ask yourself these questions to help inform your decision.

Tipsheet
Close up of two young women smiling.

Who Can Assist Me When I Go Abroad?

Personal assistance during your international exchange can come from a wide variety of sources, whether a hired professional, a friend or family member, a fellow traveler or even a friendly local. Weigh the potential pros and cons of your options to find the best fit for you.

Tipsheet
A woman and her PA in Brazil

Including Participants & Personal Assistants in Your Exchange Program

Although arranging and funding personal assistance services (PAS) for international exchange participants is not required (or only limited to program activities) by the Americans with Disabilities Act, many international exchange providers go beyond the law to ensure that a participant has appropriate services in place, recognizing that:

Tipsheet
Wheelchair users at the airline ticket counter

Air Travel Tips for People with Disabilities

The logistics of overseas travel can be a challenge, even for the most intrepid traveler with a disability. Experience is an effective teacher to help you learn strategies for handling flights, customs procedures, and other aspects of entering a foreign country.

Tipsheet
A young woman using a manual wheelchair hangs onto the back of a young man's power wheelchair as he pulls her along a street.

Disability-Focused International Exchanges

As a person with a disability, you have the right to participate in the same international exchange opportunities as people who do not have disabilities. You may decide that you want to participate in an exchange program that is not specifically focused on the topic of disability, such as one focused on Japanese culture, public health, or the performing arts.

Tipsheet
Power wheelchair user on a study abroad site visit in S. Korea

Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs

Faculty-led programs are yet another route that students with disabilities may choose in order to achieve their study abroad goals. This tipsheet covers how to adapt a program for accessibility, legal responsibilities, practices collected from faculty leaders, and links to examples of faculty-led handbooks and site accessibility forms.

Tipsheet
TSA checking in African student using crutches

Navigating Airport Security

All passengers must undergo a security screening process – be patient and cooperative, but know your rights. Also allow more time for additional screening if needed.

Tipsheet
Checking in at airport

Legal Protections on Flights

You have made all your preparations for an international journey, and you don't want to see it delayed due to flight problems. Learn about your rights, and who to talk to if you have questions or issues.

Tipsheet
An African woman with a disability and her personal assistant walking.

Using Personal Assistance Services Abroad

Whether at home or abroad, personal assistance services (PAS) provide a way for some people with disabilities to fully participate in all areas of community living. Sometimes called a personal care attendant (PCA), a personal assistant (PA) assists a person with a disability to do the things she would do for herself if she did not have a disability or had other ways to accomplish the task without human assistance. This could involve:

Tipsheet
Reading a tactile map of building floor plan

Advising Blind and Low Vision Exchange Participants

People who meet the definition of legal blindness, meaning that they possess 20/200 vision or less in the best eye, will have varying levels of eyesight. Measuring or inquiring about someone's visual acuity will not give an accurate idea of the level of assistance that they require. Since there is so much variation in the type and quality of education that any given blind or visually impaired individual might have received, it is hard to make generalizations about the supports that they might need without consulting them. 

Pages