Resource Library

Event
Group of diverse women raising their arms in unison

WILD Alumni Become Trainers

WILD alumni from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Eastern Europe, and Latin America convened for the Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD) Training-of-Trainers Program, on June 18 - 30, 2015. WILD alumni used MIUSA’s new WILD Facilitator’s Guide to sharpen training skills, learned cross-disability access strategies, and applied the WILD principles of empowerment, inclusion and pride to training activities.

Training graduates received small grants from MIUSA and partnered with local organizations to extend the WILD leadership training experience to 400 disabled women and girls in 19 countries.

News
Zero Project Innovative Practice Winner 2015

Zero Project Recognizes WILD as Innovative Practice

On February 25, 2015, Mobility International USA received an innovative practice award from the Zero Project at the United Nations Headquarters in Vienna, for its signature women's leadership training, the Women's Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD). WILD was recognized as one of 39 "Innovative Practices" for 2015 at the international summit which was attended by more than 400 experts in the field of disability rights and inclusion from over 50 countries.

Event
A group of women with disabilities singing

2016 Women's Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD)

The 8th International Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD) brought together 20 women leaders with disabilities from 20 different countries to Eugene, Oregon, USA from July 30th - August 21st, 2016. This intensive leadership training program served to strengthen leadership capacity, create new visions and build international networks of support for women with disabilities.

Personal Story
Portrait of Dulamsuren

Advancing Disability Rights through the Arts

I was the only child in my Mongolian elementary school who was losing her hearing. At first I was considered disruptive and someone who should be sent home, but gradually my teachers realized I could study just as well as my classmates. Today, if I compare myself to them, I’m living better than most.

Personal Story
Portrait of Madezha

Mentoring the Next Generation of Women Leaders

I was born with a visual disability and became totally blind by the age of 28. Over the course of my life I developed a strong desire to contribute to my country and strengthen the disability movement in Peru.

After returning home from WILD, I was very inspired and empowered to do many things. Being in contact with women with disabilities from other countries, who have rich and varied experiences, gave me new energy and motivated me to achieve my dreams.

Personal Story
Portrait of Karine

Creating Innovative Organizations

My life was full of obstacles, difficulties, disappointments and stress as I was born with cerebral palsy in Armenia. However, due to my great willpower, industriousness, and optimistic character I have been very successful in my life.

Before I participated in the Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability in the U.S., I was very shy. I had never traveled alone. After I returned to Armenia from WILD, I wanted to change everything. As that desire grew and thanks to a grant from the Global Fund for Women, I took the first steps to found my own organization.

Personal Story
Portrait of Kanika

Changing the World through Education

I was born in Cambodia and contracted Polio at nine months old. Even at a young age I dreamt of becoming a leader for people with disabilities, traveling to different countries, and living independently.

Personal Story
Portrait of Ekaete

Realizing the Right to Sexual and Reproductive Health

In Nigeria, my culture places so much emphasis on the physical beauty of girls and women. As a polio survivor, I know that this notion causes most women and girls with disabilities to perceive their bodies as being unattractive and unacceptable. In turn, women and girls with disabilities treat their bodies with less value, which of course has serious implications for their sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Best Practice
Group photo of women with disabilities from WILD Training of Trainers program 2015

Scaling Up Leadership Training for Women with Disabilities

WILD is a highly selective, intensive three-week training that brings together women with disabilities from around the world. The training is held in Eugene, Oregon, a model city that embraces human rights, diversity and inclusion. Women with disabilities who are selected for the WILD program demonstrate leadership potential. WILD is an investment in that potential which will “trampoline” them to the next level.

News
Image shows various styles and colors of the Loud, Proud and Passionate! tshirt

Loud, Proud & Passionate!® T-shirt Campaign Launches

All profits will support Mobility International USA’s (MIUSA) Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD), our signature women’s leadership training program. This highly selective, intensive three-week training brings together women with disabilities from around the world to share their experiences and strategies, build skills, and strengthen networks of support. 

We have raised the majority of the funding we need for WILD 2016. This t-shirt campaign is the final push that will bring us to our fundraising goal!

Personal Story
WILD women and resource people holding their hands in the air

Demanding Change in India

Never underestimate the power of disabled women.

Especially when they’re WILD women fighting their way to the forefront of the social debates, strategic planning sessions, and discussions about ending violence, illiteracy, unemployment, poverty, and inaccessible health services.

Personal Story
Luu Thi Anh Loan wearing a graduation cap and gown

Breaking through Barriers in Vietnam

A neighbor once told to my mom that there was no space for people with disabilities after graduation, that I should stay home to learn sewing, embroidering, or doing housework.

Handiwork and household jobs were popular for girls with disabilities in the 1990s, and I recognized many people with disabilities in general stopped their education because of discrimination. I tried to convince my parents to give me an opportunity to study further and expressed my expectation to live independently. It took me long time to get an approval from my parents.

Personal Story
Portrait of Teuta

Celebrating the Brilliant & Resilient: Teuta’s Story

"I got so tired of people crying for me every time I ventured onto the streets of Albania in my wheelchair that I decided it would be better to just stay home. I was only twenty-five when I was in a terrible car accident that caused irreparable damage to my spinal cord. As a result, I am now a paraplegic and a wheelchair user.

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