Resource Library

Event
Illustration of Golden Gate Bridge with two women with disabilities holding hands in front of it. The test says WILD San Francisco June 2-3, 2017. The MIUSA logo is in the upper lefthand corner.

WILD - San Francisco

Fourteen young women with disabilities from the San Francisco Bay Area convened for an intensive, two-day training. The training was designed to increase leadership skills and disability pride, as well as explore opportunities to launch an international career. Following the training, MIUSA is providing stipends for graduates to multiply the impact of the workshop by conducting one two-hour session for other girls and women (with and without disabilities) in their communities.

Event
Oksana on Skinner's Butte with Spencer's Butte in the distance.

MIUSA Welcomed a Russian College Student with a Disability to the U.S.

MIUSA hosted an arrival orientation in July 2017 for a student participating in the Year of Exchange in America for Russians (YEAR) program. She traveled to Eugene, Oregon, before embarking on a year of study at a U.S. university.

The YEAR program provides an opportunity for students to live in the U.S. for a year while learning about American society, educating Americans about Russian history and culture, improving English speaking skills, strengthening knowledge in an academic field, and experiencing immersion in a local community.

Personal Story
WILD Bangladesh delegates group holding banner

Empowering Women with Disabilities in Bangladesh

Bringing together 21 women with diverse disabilities in the capital of Bangladesh, Ms. Desai shared leadership principles and practical skills to empower women with disabilities and build a network for disability advocacy. Each participant was selected based on her commitment to pursuing higher education and leadership positions in the community.  

In Bangladesh, the belief still remains that women with disabilities should stay sheltered in their homes and many young women therefore have limited access to and awareness of educational and community resources.

Tipsheet

Students with Disabilities, by Program and Disability Type

YES Students with Disabilities by Disability Type (2007-2016), as shown on a pie chart.

44% Deaf/HOH
35% Blind/Low Vision
19% Physical Disability 
20% Non-apparent 

FLEX Students with Disabilities by Disability Type (2007-2016), as shown on a pie chart.

59% Physical Disability 
8% Deaf/HOH
4% Non-apparent 
29% Blind/Low Vision

Tipsheet

FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities Combined, by Disability Type

Total Number of Students by Disability Type (2007-2016)

  • 40% Physical Disability 
  • 32% Blind/ Low Vision 
  • 25% Deaf/HOH
  • 2% Non-apparent

Students with Physical Disabilities

  • 37% Cerebral Palsy 
  • 11% Scoliosis 
  • 7% Short Stature 
  • 8% Amputee 
  • 3% Spina Bifida 
  • 1% Polio 
  • 1% Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 
  • 32% Other 
Tipsheet

Specialized vs. Mainstream School Placements

Percent of Deaf or Blind Students Placed at Specialized Schools vs. Mainstream Schools (2007-2016)

Illustrated by highlighted symbols of students and a schoolhouse

  • 50% of students who are Deaf are placed at specialized schools vs. in mainstream public schools 
  • 25% of students who are blind are placed at specialized schools vs. in mainstream public schools
Tipsheet
Hands holding an iphone with speech accessibility options on screen.

5 Essential iPhone Apps for Blind or Visually Impaired Travelers

Blind Square

This connects with your iPhone's GPS functions to bring you live vocalized information about where you're at and where you're going. Open the application and let it run in the background, as it tells you the street you're walking on, addresses that you pass, cross streets, and landmarks of interest. Do searches for the nearest breakfast spot or the convention center, and Blind Square will help get you there. It is excellent for getting oriented to a new place, or just getting the name of that street when there is no one around.

Tipsheet
A portion of an infographic highlighting total percentage of FLEX and YES students by disability type.

Infographics: Disability Inclusion in the FLEX and YES Programs, 2007-2016

The Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) and Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) programs are competitive, merit-based scholarship programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

Over the last ten years, more than 250 students with disabilities from 37 countries have participated these life-changing youth programs.

Personal Story
South Sudan women, including one in a wheelchair and one with crutches, come outside from a conference room

Women's Empowerment through Reproductive Rights Education

"The right to health for women with disabilities must be respected and taken as a priority by the community and the government!"
WILD-South Sudan participant

In South Sudan, like many parts of the developing world, women and girls with disabilities have historically been denied their right to sexual and reproductive health. 

Tipsheet

FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities, 2007-2016

A line graph showing the total number of FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities, by Year, 2007-2016

Number of FLEX Students with Disabilities, by Year

  • 2007 = 16

  • 2008 = 14

  • 2009 = 12

  • 2010 = 12

  • 2011 = 12

  • 2012 = 14

  • 2013 = 9

  • 2014 = 20

  • 2015 = 11

  • 2016 = 14

Personal Story
Ana smiling in front of bookshelves at school library

Flying High to Study in the United States

At just 16 years old, Ana was so confident that she and her wheelchair would soon be on their way to the U.S., she told practically everyone she knew that she had applied to the Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

Although Ana didn’t make the final selection pool the first time, she tried again a year later.

"When I applied the second time, I didn’t tell anybody except my mom. Most of my family found out that I was going to fly two days before my flight when we had my farewell party. They were shocked!"

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