Identity Reflection Activity for Travelers

Text against a teal banner reads "identity reflection activity for travelers" with illustration of a sign post displaying signs labeled with things like "disability" "sexual orientation" "race/ethnicity" "gender" and more
Use this worksheet to reflect on your own layers of identity and how they might impact - and even enhance - your future travels abroad.

View this article as it appears in the AWAY Journal (PDF) or download it as a Word file under Documents at the end of this page.

Here’s how: For this exercise, read over the statements listed below. Next, select the aspect of your identity with which you most associate each statement, or feel free to select more than one! Space “H” is left blank in case you’d like to add in another identity category that isn’t already listed. 

Identities

A. Disability
B. Race/Ethnicity
C. Gender
D. Sexual orientation
E. Nationality
F. Religion
G. Economic status
H. [fill in the blank!]

Statements

  • I am most proud of this part of my identity:

  • I am most aware of this part of my identity:

  • I wonder how this part of my identity might impact my relationship with the host community:

  • I don't often think about this part of my identity:

  • I sometimes worry about how this part of my identity might impact my relationship with other students:

  • I sometimes worry about how this part of my identity might impact my relationship with the host community:

  • While traveling, this part of my identity feels really important to me:

  • I want to learn more about this part of my identity:

Debrief and Reflection

What was interesting about this exercise? What was challenging? As you reflect on your identities, what kind of additional information, resources, and preparation might you need before going abroad?

Try using this self-reflection tool multiple times throughout your international exchange journey; your responses may change over time!

This worksheet was adapted with permission from Seattle University’s Education Abroad Office

 

This article is part of the AWAY Journal - Intersections Abroad issue.