Resource Library

Tip Sheets
infographic of 3 circular images: 1) 3 students sitting at their desks arranged in a circle, 2) hand writing on a piece of paper with pencil, 3) 2 people speaking face to face.

Infographic: No-Cost Universal Design Examples

No-Cost! Universal Design Examples to Increase Access to Language Learning

From gathering information, to expressing ideas, and staying engaged – individuals learn in various ways.

Tip Sheets
Illustrated collage of world landmark postage stamps and luggage tags with text: "Where do US citizens want to go? Where do international visitors to the US come from? Everywhere!" with list of world regions

Infographic: Ask NCDE!

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by Mobility International USA, NCDE is your free resource to start you on your journey. Get to know us!

Tip: Download the accessible infographic under Documents or view on Flickr.

Tip Sheets
Empty wheelchair outside Asian temple

Infographic: Get Your Planning Started

People with disabilities live and travel everywhere these days. By planning creatively, collaborating with others, and being flexible there’s no need to limit yourself to places that are more like home. Your decision may be less about the country where you go, and more about the type or length of program that works for you.

Tip Sheets
foreign currency

10 Scholarships to Fund Your Travels Abroad

Be an ambassador for peace, master a foreign language, give back through services…and do it all in another country! These ten scholarship opportunities can help make it happen. Although each one has its own eligibility requirements, all of them are open to U.S. citizens with disabilities.

Tip Sheets
Faculty-led study abroad group to Italy

Knowing Your Rights and Responsibilities

It is important to know your rights, your responsibilities, and what is guiding the current practices of study abroad programs. There are good reasons for providing accommodations but you also need to look at the entire program to gauge accessibility and be clear and realistic about what programs can deliver.

Tip Sheets
Pie chart with data below on First-Year International Students

The Numbers Tell the Story Infographic

You are not imagining it! The majority of disabled international students who arrive on U.S. campuses, and Americans with disabilities who study abroad, have non-apparent disabilities. Download this infographic to learn other characteristics and statistics about this population.

Tip Sheets

Dealing with Doubts

Alyssa Hillary, an Autistic student blogging about her study abroad experience in China, is having a successful time but the initial reaction from the overseas university would have made one think that was not possible.

“[Chinese administrators] said people like me shouldn’t go to college, and they tried to get the program to un-accept me, and they tried to have me sent home.”

Tip Sheets
Ethnically diverse study abroad students with disabilities

Students with Disabilities in Education Abroad Statistics

The number of students with disabilities participating in study abroad is likely to increase in the coming years - be ready for them! These surveys look at overall satisfaction, disability supports, and participation levels of students with disabilities.

Tip Sheets
A young woman wearing sari material as she uses a wheelchair is petting several animals in a local courtyard.

College/University Programs

Each year, thousands of American undergraduate and graduate students with and without disabilities travel abroad on international academic exchange programs. These students are brushing up on new languages, advancing their cross-cultural awareness, and building valuable independence - all skills that make a hearty resume for future employment opportunities. You can, too!

Tip Sheets
Line of exchange participants practicing sitting meditation

Successful Study Abroad with a Mental Health Condition

At a recent study abroad conference over 250 professionals chose to attend our panel session on mental health. Why was there so much interest?

People attended our session largely to find out how to avert or deal with a crisis. After we did our best to relieve some of their uncertainty and shared suggestions for improving the design and preparations of study abroad programs, we had a chance to end with this message:

For every student with a mental health-related disability who experiences a crisis abroad, many more will succeed.

Tip Sheets
Missing wearing traditional Japanese clothes at shrine

Japan Focus: ADHD and Traveling with Medication

From time to time we get inquiries from people with ADHD wishing to study in Japan, and they are overwhelmed with the confusing maze of rules and regulations vis-à-vis their medications. Japan’s rules for medications, such as those related to ADHD or pain management, are unique, and they required a unique tipsheet.

A Yakkan Shoumei is a certificate authorizing permission for you to bring medication into the country.