Resource Library

Tipsheet
A laptop displays a world map. A hand reads the braille display attached to the laptop at a desk.

Career Opportunities with EDDI Member Organizations

The organizations below are members of MIUSA's Excellence in Development and Disability Inclusion (EDDI) initiative, committed to inclusion and diversity both in the work that they do and in their teams. Because more people with disabilities are needed in international development careers, we highly encourage people with disabilities to explore their careers pages to find information about current jobs, internships, fellowships and other opportunities in the United States and around the world.

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GDDI group photo

Measuring the Impact of WILD

"WILD has succeeded in raising strong and dynamic women who are assertive enough to engage their community leaders to promote the issues of women and girls with disabilities in their countries. I am such an example; my level of confidence has tripled since WILD."
- Ekaete Umoh, WILD Alumna from Nigeria

To date more than 220 women with disabilities from over 83 countries have participated in MIUSA's International WILD program. 

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WILD Panama Group Photo

The Power of WILD Seed Grants

“We should not wait for what people will do for us, but we should try to create impact and make our contributions felt in society.” 
​– WILD-Uganda participant

Personal Story
WILD Bangladesh delegates group holding banner

Empowering Women with Disabilities in Bangladesh

Bringing together 21 women with diverse disabilities in the capital of Bangladesh, Ms. Desai shared leadership principles and practical skills to empower women with disabilities and build a network for disability advocacy. Each participant was selected based on her commitment to pursuing higher education and leadership positions in the community.  

In Bangladesh, the belief still remains that women with disabilities should stay sheltered in their homes and many young women therefore have limited access to and awareness of educational and community resources.

Personal Story
South Sudan women, including one in a wheelchair and one with crutches, come outside from a conference room

Women's Empowerment through Reproductive Rights Education

"The right to health for women with disabilities must be respected and taken as a priority by the community and the government!"
WILD-South Sudan participant

In South Sudan, like many parts of the developing world, women and girls with disabilities have historically been denied their right to sexual and reproductive health. 

Tipsheet
Inclusive HIV/AIDs clinic in Africa

Implementing Inclusive HIV/AIDS Programs

Many factors contribute to the increased risk that people with disabilities experience for contracting HIV/AIDS, and to the fact that individuals with disabilities who also have HIV/AIDS often lack appropriate information and access to treatment.  In turn, without appropriate teatment, HIV/AIDS can result in secondary disabilities. HIV/AIDS programmers should seek out training and resources to ensure their activities are disability-inclusive.

Books/Journals/Podcasts
Two women look at the WILD Facilitator's manual

Loud, Proud and Passionate!® Facilitator's Guide

This manual is based on Mobility International USA (MIUSA)’s unique model of international leadership training, the Women’s Institute on Leadership and Disability (WILD). WILD began in 1997 is an outcome of the Beijing UN Women’s Conference and is held in Eugene, Oregon, USA. The WILD program offers an effective model for empowering women with disabilities to be leaders across the globe.

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Group photo of women with disabilities from WILD Training of Trainers program 2015

WILD: Empowering Women with Disabilities Globally

WILD is a highly selective, intensive three-week training that brings together women with disabilities from around the world. The training is held in Eugene, Oregon, a model city that embraces human rights, diversity and inclusion. Women with disabilities who are selected for the WILD program demonstrate leadership potential. WILD is an investment in that potential which will “trampoline” them to the next level.

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Flowchart of Empower Partnership Model. 19 NGO in-country partners, 19 DPO in-country partners, and 19 U.S. partners formed 19 international teams which resulted in 57 organizations changing communities.

An Innovative New Partnership Model

Empower Partnerships created 19 teams, each a triad:  A U.S. organization matched with two partner organizations from another country, one disability-led and the other committed to disability inclusion.

U.S. representatives first traveled to their partners’ home countries to gain an understanding of disability access and inclusion in their communities.

Personal Story
Portrait of Teuta

Celebrating the Brilliant & Resilient: Teuta’s Story

"I got so tired of people crying for me every time I ventured onto the streets of Albania in my wheelchair that I decided it would be better to just stay home. I was only twenty-five when I was in a terrible car accident that caused irreparable damage to my spinal cord. As a result, I am now a paraplegic and a wheelchair user.

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Team Serbia lined up behind a counter of food

Team Serbia: Tackling Media's Role in Disability Advocacy

Two partners from Serbia and one from the U.S. joined forces to reimagine the use of the media as a platform for disability rights advocacy. Media can be a powerful tool for empowerment. The rapidly changing media landscape gives people with disabilities the tools to tell their stories directly.

“The media have perhaps the most important role in disability advocacy,” said Jelena Jovovic of the Novi Sad School of Journalism in Novi Sad, Serbia. “We receive the majority of our information through the media and, based on this information, we form our attitudes.”

Jelena, along with Mima Ruzicic-Novkovic of Center Upright Living, a Disabled Peoples’ Organization in Novi Sad, and Beth Haller and Rhonda Greenhaw of Towson University’s Department of Mass Communication located in Maryland, USA, met in Serbia for a week to jumpstart their collaborations.

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Members of Team Mongolia with training attendees

In Mongolia, Rights Start with Inclusive Education

When asked why they had chosen to work together, the Association of Parents with Disabled Children (APDC) and All for Education! (AFE) National Civil Society Coalition made a simple but powerful prediction about their partnership: “Our voices would be louder together.” Given the challenge they faced, all their voices were needed.

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Children holding banner for Empower reading camp

Adapting Techniques for Literacy in Malaysia

Haziq sings a solo in front of his classmates at the closing ceremony of his weeklong reading camp. It’s a small crowd, and he hasn’t memorized the lyrics. Instead, Haziq is reading them from a screen at the front of the room. It may not seem like much, but to Haziq, it could be the very turning point of his life. And it took three people traveling halfway around the world and back to get him there.

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Team Dominican Republic of eight women gathered

Disabled Women's Movement on the Rise in Dominican Republic

Kimberly Tissot, Executive Director of Able South Carolina, heard the determination in the voices of her partners in the Dominican Republic: “We need to know how it is possible for you to be independent in the U.S., and how to make those changes here.”

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