Resource Library

Personal Stories
Muhammad gives two thumbs up as he gets set up on a recumbent bicycle.

Like Father, Like Son

When Muhammad, a U.S. Department of State-funded Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) student from Pakistan, first arrived in the United States, he had no idea what to expect. But, he brimmed with excitement at the opportunity to experience life in America. His exchange experience was unique because he would be experiencing true immersion in not just one, but two non-native languages: English and American Sign Language (ASL).

Tip Sheets
Hands on braille keyboard

Quick Tips for Accessible Web Forms

Address common accessibility issues by designing your web forms and documents to be accessible from the start! To check out how a webpage would be read to a blind individual using a screenreader, download the Fangs Screen Reader Emulator, a Firefox plugin. To try using a real screen reader, download NVDA for Windows.

Tip Sheets
A group of women and men on laptops

Seven Steps for Setting Up an Accessible Virtual Exchange

  1. Know your toolbox. Many e-learning platforms and tools that are popular for virtual exchanges come equipped with various accessibility features, such as tools for embedding captions, screenreading compatibility, or keyboard navigation. Research which accessibility features are included in your platform of choice. If it offers little in the way of accessibility, either think through alternative methods for providing access or use a different platform.
Tip Sheets
A young woman types on a computer with projector screens.

Legal Trends for Accessible Media

What an age we live in! Advances in technology have made it possible for us to learn, work, innovate, network, and be entertained in ways that weren't possible not so long ago. With the support of the following U.S. laws and policies, people with disabilities can be full and active participants - not just spectators - in the age of exciting new technologies, especially those that bring people together virtually.

Tip Sheets
A teenage boy uses sign language with a person on a computer screen.

Accessible Virtual Exchanges

Virtual exchanges are growing more popular for sharing information and ideas across international borders. There is no precise formula to virtual exchanges, but they typically take the form of online cross-cultural courses between individuals, between classrooms, or between institutions around the world. Educational activities and dialogues may draw from video, audio, text, and social media.

Personal Stories
Old European building

A Votre Sante - To Your Health!

In the cafeteria lunch line of the Cité Scolaire Albert Camus, I stood between two high school teachers and a small group of giggling junior high girls who recognized me as “elle,” or “her”— the American girl who was spending a year as an English language assistant. Shyly, one of the girls dared to test out her English skills, and tentatively offered a greeting, “Hello?”

Personal Stories
Statue of Chinese dragon, Chinese lanterns in background

Acupuncture Needles and Insulin Syringes

With a deep-fried scorpion staring at me from the end of my chopsticks, I couldn't help but think how this delicacy in China would stump even my best diabetes doctors in the United States. How much insulin does my body require for a scorpion?!

Tip Sheets
Exchange staff smiles with blind youth

High School Exchange Programs at the U.S. State Department

The full participation of youth with disabilities in international exchange is a critical step in increasing independent living skills, accessing post-secondary education opportunities, and pursuing competitive employment. International exchange also provides an understanding and respect for other peoples and cultures, cross-cultural competencies, including foreign language proficiency, and a true global perspective.

Books and Journals
Asian-American youth stands under potted plants in Germany

A World Awaits You - Youth with Disabilities

Welcome to the online A World Awaits You (AWAY) Journal! Focused on increasing the effective participation of youth with disabilities in international exchange, this issue introduces you to youth with disabilities who have successfully gone on international exchanges and the strategies that were influential in their success.

Personal Stories
View of the Arc de Triomphe on a bright day

Tracing the Steps of a Deaf Leader through France

As a teacher at the Wisconsin School for the Deaf, my students started a project to assist their peers who struggle with reading. Although my students are fluent English readers, the vast majority of the school’s freshmen students are English Language Learners who cannot read at the 9th grade level, which makes novels used for course curricula inaccessible to them.

Tip Sheets
Pushing woman in wheelchair up a ramp.

How Will I Pay for Personal Assistance Abroad?

The costs of international travel for just one person - whether for airfare, housing, or all the tasty local food - are harrowing enough. So if you're someone who will require the services of a personal assistant during your international exchange experience, the idea of doubling or even tripling these expenses can make it seem like international travel is out of reach.

Not so! For affordable PAS abroad, look for creative ways to reduce or share costs, raise funds, or negotiate with your exchange program provider to help defray the costs.

Tip Sheets
A woman and her PA in Brazil

Including Participants & Personal Assistants in Your Exchange Program

Although arranging and funding personal assistance services (PAS) for international exchange participants is not required (or only limited to program activities) by the Americans with Disabilities Act, many international exchange providers go beyond the law to ensure that a participant has appropriate services in place, recognizing that:

Tip Sheets
Wheelchair users at the airline ticket counter

Air Travel Tips for People with Disabilities

The logistics of overseas travel can be a challenge, even for the most intrepid traveler with a disability. Experience is an effective teacher to help you learn strategies for handling flights, customs procedures, and other aspects of entering a foreign country.

Tip Sheets
Power wheelchair user on a study abroad site visit in S. Korea

Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs

Faculty-led programs are yet another route that students with disabilities may choose in order to achieve their study abroad goals. This tipsheet covers how to adapt a program for accessibility, legal responsibilities, practices collected from faculty leaders, and links to examples of faculty-led handbooks and site accessibility forms.

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