Resource Library

Tip Sheets
Camel resting

Creative Ways to Get Around Abroad

Whether trekking through dense jungles or scaling tall temples, traversing over tough terrain is sometimes necessary on our international adventures. Scroll through our photo slideshow to see how other intrepid travelers with mobility disabilities have forged ahead on their international paths - by tractor, by piggyback, and even by yak!

Tip Sheets
Hands on braille keyboard

Quick Tips for Accessible Web Forms

Address common accessibility issues by designing your web forms and documents to be accessible from the start! To check out how a webpage would be read to a blind individual using a screenreader, download the Fangs Screen Reader Emulator, a Firefox plugin. To try using a real screen reader, download NVDA for Windows.

Tip Sheets
A group of women and men on laptops

Seven Steps for Setting Up an Accessible Virtual Exchange

  1. Know your toolbox. Many e-learning platforms and tools that are popular for virtual exchanges come equipped with various accessibility features, such as tools for embedding captions, screenreading compatibility, or keyboard navigation. Research which accessibility features are included in your platform of choice. If it offers little in the way of accessibility, either think through alternative methods for providing access or use a different platform.
Tip Sheets
A young woman types on a computer with projector screens.

Legal Trends for Accessible Media

What an age we live in! Advances in technology have made it possible for us to learn, work, innovate, network, and be entertained in ways that weren't possible not so long ago. With the support of the following U.S. laws and policies, people with disabilities can be full and active participants - not just spectators - in the age of exciting new technologies, especially those that bring people together virtually.

Tip Sheets
A teenage boy uses sign language with a person on a computer screen.

Accessible Virtual Exchanges

Virtual exchanges are growing more popular for sharing information and ideas across international borders. There is no precise formula to virtual exchanges, but they typically take the form of online cross-cultural courses between individuals, between classrooms, or between institutions around the world. Educational activities and dialogues may draw from video, audio, text, and social media.

Tip Sheets
Pushing woman in wheelchair up a ramp.

How Will I Pay for Personal Assistance Abroad?

The costs of international travel for just one person - whether for airfare, housing, or all the tasty local food - are harrowing enough. So if you're someone who will require the services of a personal assistant during your international exchange experience, the idea of doubling or even tripling these expenses can make it seem like international travel is out of reach.

Not so! For affordable PAS abroad, look for creative ways to reduce or share costs, raise funds, or negotiate with your exchange program provider to help defray the costs.

Tip Sheets
A woman and her PA in Brazil

Including Participants & Personal Assistants in Your Exchange Program

Although arranging and funding personal assistance services (PAS) for international exchange participants is not required (or only limited to program activities) by the Americans with Disabilities Act, many international exchange providers go beyond the law to ensure that a participant has appropriate services in place, recognizing that:

Tip Sheets
TSA checking in African student using crutches

Navigating Airport Security

All passengers must undergo a security screening process – be patient and cooperative, but know your rights. Also allow more time for additional screening if needed.

Tip Sheets
An African woman with a disability and her personal assistant walking.

Using Personal Assistance Services Abroad

Whether at home or abroad, personal assistance services (PAS) provide a way for some people with disabilities to fully participate in all areas of community living. Sometimes called a personal care attendant (PCA), a personal assistant (PA) assists a person with a disability to do the things she would do for herself if she did not have a disability or had other ways to accomplish the task without human assistance. This could involve:

Tip Sheets
A magnifying glass is held to a document labeled "visa."

Visa Considerations for Exchange Participants with Disabilities

Most international exchange participants are issued a J-1 or F-1 visa in order to enter the United States. Most of the rules and regulations for visas are the same for participants with or without disabilities, but there are also some additional considerations that people with disabilities should know. Find out how visa regulations may be impacted by a chronic illness, a pre-existing health condition, or personal assistance.

Tip Sheets
Hand of someone reading braille on the edge of a public bus posted schedule

An Overview of Braille around the World

You need to access the same information as everyone else who is on your exchange program or when navigating your new adventures overseas. The differences from home may mean you need to learn contracted Braille or specialized symbols specific to a foreign language.

Tip Sheets
a portable ramp with handrails

Inaccessible? Ramp it!

The slope of a ramp should be no greater than 1:12, which is 12 feet (or meters) of horizontal ramp for every 1 foot (or meter) of vertical height. Some people with disabilities can use personal ramps that are shorter and steeper than 1:12. Before building a short ramp to provide access for a person with a disability, discuss whether a steeper ramp would work for that individual.