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Tip Sheets
EducationUSA website snapshot that says "For International Students: U.S. Study Opportunities Abound"

EducationUSA: Your Official Source for U.S. Higher Education

EducationUSA Advisers around the world offer information, orientation, and guidance as you search for higher education institutions in the United States that fits your needs. EducationUSA makes applying to a U.S. college or university clear.

Tip Sheets
International students sitting and smiling on bleachers at sports game.

Accommodations for Non-Native English Speakers

“Do international students get extra time? Is being a non-native English speaker a disability?” This question comes up frequently from international students and disability service offices.  At first thought, many offices would easily say “no” and “no." Should it be that easy?

Many academic departments and student service offices may initially assume that issues arise solely from being a non-native English speaker, but it may also mean that a disability is not recognized, and a second look should be given to these students.

Tip Sheets
Word cloud featuring the phrase "Student with" surrounded by diverse types of disabilities

Track Students with Disabilities in Your Study Abroad Reporting

Through the Open Doors® survey compiled annually by the Institute on International Education, we have a general snapshot of how many U.S. college students with disabilities study abroad and their disability types. But until more U.S. higher education institutions respond with these disability statistics, we won't have a complete picture. Your institution is needed to bring the snapshot into greater focus!

To do this, help ensure that your institution responds to the Open Doors® survey, including its two questions about students with disabilities going abroad.

Tip Sheets
Pie chart with data below on First-Year International Students

The Numbers Tell the Story Infographic

You are not imagining it! The majority of disabled international students who arrive on U.S. campuses, and Americans with disabilities who study abroad, have non-apparent disabilities. Download this infographic to learn other characteristics and statistics about this population.

Tip Sheets
Low slope ramp with double handrails and tactile surface

Which U.S. School or University is Best to Place a Student with a Disability?

A qualified student, regardless of where the student is living when applying, cannot be refused admissions based on disability or anticipated accommodation needs.

Most disability service staff on campus or in the school district and disability organizations in the community can locate and provide what is needed for the student though it may take time, funds, and energy to find a good match for the student in regards to accommodation needs. The student may want to choose schools based on what is already available on campus and in the community.