Resource Library

Tip Sheets
U.S. campus with brick buildings and trees.

Top 10 Disability Resources On-Campus

International students and scholars with disabilities can often find what they need at their U.S. colleges and universities. Do a bit of research to find out if your U.S. college or university offers these ten offices or departments, which can work with you to make sure that you have full access to everything you do at school, whether it's taking a test or participating in a club or event.

Tip Sheets
A smiling Ghanaian woman is near a building and sign that reads "Vermont Center for Independent Living."

Disability Organizations in the U.S.

Many of the services provided by these organizations are available to every person with a disability, regardless of citizenship. Community-based and state-based disability organizations are especially helpful to international visitors who will not have access to disability services through a U.S. university or college.

Tip Sheets
Two young women, one American and one Jordanian, lean towards each other in conversation.

Common Questions

"Can I go on a MIUSA exchange program?" "Which U.S. exchange program is right for me?" See if we answered your question about finding exchange opportunities in the U.S.

Tip Sheets
A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

Tip Sheets
Three international men with disabilities clap and cheer.

Funded Programs to the U.S.

Apply for a program that will cover your expenses to the U.S. as you advance your professional or academic goals.

Tip Sheets
Two women present a third women with a special award certificate.

Scholarships for U.S. Study

Most international students fund their U.S. studies through personal or family savings. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you and your family will have to pay using savings or loans. Learn the basic facts about scholarships, then browse examples of popular scholarship opportunities.

Personal Stories
A smiling woman looks off in the distance. Behind her is a sign that says "We all smile in the same language" with images of children with and without disabilities.

The Value of Student Exchanges to Developing Countries — and the U.S.

When students travel to another country to study as part of an exchange program, the benefits don’t just accrue to the individual student — communities across borders gain from the experience.

USAID funds student exchanges between institutions in developing countries and U.S. colleges and universities. The students who come to the U.S. gain knowledge and skills they can use back home, which in the long run can result in higher employment, enhanced productivity and a stronger economy in their home country.

Tip Sheets
A young Pakistani girl with no legs or hands digs in a garden alongside a pet cat.

Volunteer in the U.S.A.

Volunteerism, also known as community service, is highly valued in the United States. Anyone can be a volunteer, and many international visitors with disabilities have volunteered in their U.S. host communities. Although volunteer positions are unpaid, there are many possible benefits. Make a difference in your U.S. host community by volunteering your time and talent!

Tip Sheets
A smiling blind man in a suit holds a cane while greeting a man in a formal suit.

Gain Professional Experience

Professional exchanges, such as internships and fellowships, provide opportunities for international visitors to gain career experience or to share their knowledge or skills while living in the United States. These exchanges can last from a few weeks to a few years. Many people with disabilities have traveled to the U.S. to gain career experience or to share their expertise in a variety of professional fields.

Tip Sheets
A high school girl wearing a headscarf and sitting in a wheelchair rides the lift to board a yellow school bus.

Study at a U.S. High School

"American school is so neat," signs Belvion, a Deaf exchange student from Mozambique who communicates using sign language. "They've got libraries and computers and the teachers are great. I'm loving it."

Belvion is one of the many high school students with disabilities who come to the United States every year to live and study on an exchange program. Are you ready to be an exchange student too?

Personal Stories
Lois in foreground seated in audience of African women all wearing colorful dresses

A Young African Leader, Transformed

Lois Auta was already making a difference in the lives of Nigerians with disabilities even before she was selected in 2014 to participate in the inaugural Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, the flagship program of the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI). But since returning home from her fellowship, she’s taken her advocacy to a whole new level.

Tip Sheets
A middle-aged woman addresses an audience while two younger women stand behind her to interpret in sign language. A screen behind them reads "Top Tips for English Language Learning."

Learn English

What motivates YOU to learn English? Whether it's to get a better job or to meet people around the world, take the first step to reach your goal. Join an English as a Second Language (ESL) program in the U.S. or online.

Personal Stories
Magteld smiles and rests her chin on folded hands. Exam chair in background

Propelled to New Professional Heights

Minneapolis winters can be so frigid, even the locals think twice before wandering out. But snow and sub-zero temperatures did nothing to deter Dr. Magteld Smith from making the most of her Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship while placed at the University of Minnesota. Nearly every day she bundled up against weather unlike anything she’d experienced in her native South Africa and trekked to the school’s libraries to study.

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