Resource Library

Best Practice
About two dozen Bangladeshi men and women stand in a room before a projector screen

Creating a Culture of Inclusion: One EducationUSA Adviser’s Quest

Sausan Rahmatullah has always enjoyed volunteering. So when she heard that an organization in her home of Dhaka, Bangladesh was hosting a scholarship competition for high-achieving Bangladeshi students with physical disabilities, she immediately volunteered as a judge.

Having been introduced to so many talented students with disabilities through the volunteer experience, Sausan felt compelled to do more. Fortunately, the answer was right up her alley.

Personal Story
Seated at a kitchen table, exchange student Pinar holds a bouquet of flowers in one hand while supporting a sign that reads "Welcome" with her other. She is smiling and wearing a bright yellow tank top.

Last Minute Decision Leads to Unforgettable Hosting Experience

Melissa Gulledge, CIEE Regional Director from South Carolina, has years of experience placing international exchange students from all over the world with American families, but a last minute decision to host a teenager with a disability led to one of her own family’s most meaningful hosting experiences.

The clock was ticking to match Pinar, a young woman from Turkey who is blind, with a host family and school.

Tipsheet
EducationUSA website snapshot that says "For International Students: U.S. Study Opportunities Abound"

EducationUSA: Your Official Source for U.S. Higher Education

EducationUSA Advisers around the world offer information, orientation, and guidance as you search for higher education institutions in the United States that fits your needs. EducationUSA makes applying to a U.S. college or university clear.

Best Practice
Reem sitting and smiling with students from the Association of the Visually Impaired in Alexandria, Egypt.

Knocking on Closed Doors

Reem Abou Elenain, who serves as an EducationUSA Adviser in Alexandria, Egypt, advises students who want to study in the United States. Before taking her position at EducationUSA, she was a Fulbright grantee for the Foreign Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA) program, sponsored by the U.S Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, teaching Arabic at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania.

Tipsheet
International student rides down a ramp using her wheelchair in front of the "International House Cafe".

7 Steps for #Access2USA

Step 1: Start Looking!

Remember that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) gives you the right to access educational programs offered on U.S. soil, so find an opportunity that fits your interest.

Step 2: Apply!

You have the right to an accessible application and admission process, if needed.  Many programs will allow you access to an advisor who will provide assistance.

Personal Story
Gabriela at the CLE office smiling with mentor

A Circle of Support

Gabriela knew with this support that she wanted to challenge herself to achieve more. With her family photos, favorite music, and favorite yucca breads packed, Gabriela was ready to pursue her studies at The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale in Florida.

Personal Story
Wei at a parade

Ripple Effects 2.5: A Future Achieved through Deaf Rights

People with disabilities around the world achieve success in many ways. No one knows this better than Wei Wang, a deaf woman from China who has begun to tell their stories through her work as a documentarian. Passionate about creativity, Wei holds two masters degrees in documentary production and fine arts, both in American University. In our conversation, Wei told us about her adventures as a deaf international student, and the way that she has used her creativity to make her dreams come true. Listen Now on Soundcloud for this Ripple Effects podcast episode.

Tipsheet
Volunteer to India smiles widely with arched entryways behind

What’s Your Volunteer Abroad Style?

To make the most out of your service abroad, it’s important to carefully examine your interests and skills, and your openness to partner with community members abroad who will have different perspectives. While it is not your role as a volunteer abroad to swoop in and save the day by helping others, neither should it be a situation where you are sidelined from participating because no one thought to plan for disability access. After all, interdependent partnerships rely on recognizing the contributions of everyone.

Tipsheet
International students sitting and smiling on bleachers at sports game.

Accommodations for Non-Native English Speakers

“Do international students get extra time? Is being a non-native English speaker a disability?” This question comes up frequently from international students and disability service offices.  At first thought, many offices would easily say “no” and “no." Should it be that easy?

Many academic departments and student service offices may initially assume that issues arise solely from being a non-native English speaker, but it may also mean that a disability is not recognized, and a second look should be given to these students.

Best Practice
Batuhan, Nikita, and a third student stand and smile in an outdoor setting.

Cluster Leader Shares Best Practices for Inclusion

My role as a CIEE cluster leader is to organize enhancement activities that build the leadership and teamwork skills of my students. Last year I had sixteen students in my cluster, two of whom were students with disabilities. Both were studying in the United States on programs sponsored by the U.S Department of State.

There are certain activities that we do every year as a cluster. One of the most memorable of those activities took place in the winter. All sixteen of my students went up to our little cabin, which is what we do every year, to go cross-country skiing.

Best Practice
A woman is taking the hand of a blind woman to let her feel a tactile map mounted on the wall.

A Sign of the Times: Supporting International Students with Disabilities

Masume Assaf, Director of Global Programs at Pennsylvania State University, recalls what support for international students used to look like in earlier times. In one instance, the disability services office had created a tactile map of the campus on a 6x6 board so that a Japanese blind student could use it to navigate around campus. The former Global Programs Assistant Director at the time also took this student under her wing to support her through the transition of arriving to a new disability culture with new opportunities to be independent.

Best Practice
Ruxandra Radulescu sits at computer with EducationUSA banner behind

EducationUSA Uses Assistive Technology to Increase Access

Two arched windows let light into a new gathering place in the Romanian-U.S. Fulbright Commission and its EducationUSA Advising Center. It’s less about the setting and more about what is inside this corner space that matters – new accessible computer stations.

Computers equipped with screen readers and magnifiers, two large monitors, and a desktop magnifier, which will enable students with vision disabilities to have access to test preparation materials and information about U.S. study options.

Best Practice
Rebecca hugging a Zimbabwean student who is a wheelchair user.

Practice and Partnerships: Zimbabwe to USA

Rebecca Zeigler Mano, EducationUSA Country Coordinator for Zimbabwe, has always worked to make higher education an option for many marginalized communities. She worked for a few years in the U.S. with high achieving, low income students to make sure they knew about access to higher education and scholarship opportunities. This thread continued when Rebecca started working with EducationUSA-Zimbabwe in 2000 and noticed little access for students with disabilities in local universities.

Personal Story
A young man wearing sunglasses outdoors next to a crosswalk button.

Video: How a Disabled Student Navigates Everyday Life

Tanveer Mansur Syed, from the United Arab Emirates, is one of an estimated 820,000 international students in the United States. He attends George Washington University, where he’s pursuing a master’s degree in secondary-education biology.

He’s also legally blind, so his campus experience isn’t quite the same as the average student’s. But thanks to accommodations for the disabled that were mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Syed is able to navigate his campus and the surrounding neighborhood while using innovative tools that help him keep up with his studies.

Best Practice
Karen Bauer (Right) reviewing documents with AR (Left) in a library.

A Simple Philosophy Turned A Blind Student's Dream Into Reality

Karen M. Bauer is the EducationUSA Regional Educational Advising Coordinator (REAC) for Middle East and North Africa, based out of the U.S. Embassy in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. She has a passion for international travel and cross-cultural exchange and wants to make sure everyone has the same opportunities she did.

“Growing up, my family always encouraged learning about different people from around the world and fostering cross cultural communication.”

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