Resource Library

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Illustrated collage of world landmark postage stamps and luggage tags with text: "Where do US citizens want to go? Where do international visitors to the US come from? Everywhere!" with list of world regions

Infographic: Ask NCDE!

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by Mobility International USA, NCDE is your free resource to start you on your journey. Get to know us!

Tip: Download the accessible infographic under Documents or view on Flickr.

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2 women smilling, wearing professional attire

People with Disabilities Needed in International Education Careers

As part of our ongoing work on the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange (NCDE) project, we reach out to professionals in the international exchange field - from study abroad advisors to program administrators to faculty leaders - to broaden their understanding of disability inclusion and access and how it can increase the diversity of their participants.

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Empty wheelchair outside Asian temple

Infographic: Get Your Planning Started

People with disabilities live and travel everywhere these days. By planning creatively, collaborating with others, and being flexible there’s no need to limit yourself to places that are more like home. Your decision may be less about the country where you go, and more about the type or length of program that works for you.

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Faculty-led study abroad group to Italy

Knowing Your Rights and Responsibilities

It is important to know your rights, your responsibilities, and what is guiding the current practices of study abroad programs. There are good reasons for providing accommodations but you also need to look at the entire program to gauge accessibility and be clear and realistic about what programs can deliver.

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Camel resting

Creative Ways to Get Around Abroad

Whether trekking through dense jungles or scaling tall temples, traversing over tough terrain is sometimes necessary on our international adventures. Scroll through our photo slideshow to see how other intrepid travelers with mobility disabilities have forged ahead on their international paths - by tractor, by piggyback, and even by yak!

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Wheelchair strapped to the back of a motor scooter.

Wheelchair-Accessible Transportation

With information and an open mind, there are many ways to successfully problem solve transportation issues in any country. Depending on where someone will be living, transportation can vary dramatically. In big cities and even small towns in many countries, taxis, buses and public transport will be wheelchair accessible. Some basic questions about where a participant will be, what is common in that area, and what alternatives exist will help you think through the transportation options.

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Young girl transfered from wheelchair to bedroom desk to study

Wheelchair Access in Lodging

The living situation for an exchange participant is not just a place to stay, but a way to learn about family, culture and language. Some participants will be better suited to living in a dormitory, while others will thrive in a homestay family. In either case, what's key is finding a place and people who will welcome a participant with a disability into many aspects of life in the new country.

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Looking at laptop

#ChangeExchange Infographic

Youth represent our next generation of thought leaders, scientists, politicians, and teachers. Our world needs their full engagement as global citizens. But, are we reaching everyone?

Are you a visual learner? Download the designed PDF of this infographic to fully see these statistics and characteristics. Find it under Documents.

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Young foreign student with mobility disability talks with an advisor

Knowing What Disability Questions to Ask: Sample Accommodations Forms

Are you advising someone with a disability who is traveling abroad for your volunteer, study or professional program? Do you know what questions to ask to assist them in preparing for travel and living abroad related to their disability?

These access information forms provide starting points to learn more about what may be needed. The advisor guidelines also help know what the individual's responses may mean and what follow-up questions you could ask. Download and adapt these for your own use; it may mean asking fewer questions on the forms and more in face to face conversations.

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Pie chart with data below on First-Year International Students

The Numbers Tell the Story Infographic

You are not imagining it! The majority of disabled international students who arrive on U.S. campuses, and Americans with disabilities who study abroad, have non-apparent disabilities. Download this infographic to learn other characteristics and statistics about this population.

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Dealing with Doubts

Alyssa Hillary, an Autistic student blogging about her study abroad experience in China, is having a successful time but the initial reaction from the overseas university would have made one think that was not possible.

“[Chinese administrators] said people like me shouldn’t go to college, and they tried to get the program to un-accept me, and they tried to have me sent home.”

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Exchange staff smiles with blind youth

High School Exchange Programs at the U.S. State Department

The full participation of youth with disabilities in international exchange is a critical step in increasing independent living skills, accessing post-secondary education opportunities, and pursuing competitive employment. International exchange also provides an understanding and respect for other peoples and cultures, cross-cultural competencies, including foreign language proficiency, and a true global perspective.

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Pushing woman in wheelchair up a ramp.

How Will I Pay for Personal Assistance Abroad?

The costs of international travel for just one person - whether for airfare, housing, or all the tasty local food - are harrowing enough. So if you're someone who will require the services of a personal assistant during your international exchange experience, the idea of doubling or even tripling these expenses can make it seem like international travel is out of reach.

Not so! For affordable PAS abroad, look for creative ways to reduce or share costs, raise funds, or negotiate with your exchange program provider to help defray the costs.

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Wheelchair users at the airline ticket counter

Air Travel Tips for People with Disabilities

The logistics of overseas travel can be a challenge, even for the most intrepid traveler with a disability. Experience is an effective teacher to help you learn strategies for handling flights, customs procedures, and other aspects of entering a foreign country.

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TSA checking in African student using crutches

Navigating Airport Security

All passengers must undergo a security screening process – be patient and cooperative, but know your rights. Also allow more time for additional screening if needed.

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