Resource Library

Best Practices
In the foreground graphic, a metal pole supports an orange rectangular road sign labeled “Collaboration” and below it, a green sign labeled “Portland Community College.” In the background photo, fir trees tower above a narrow road that bends through a forest.

Think Global, Act Universal

Some international education professionals share anecdotes about scrambling to find accessible housing and transportation options when a student unexpectedly showed up to the program site in a wheelchair; others recall students who took them by surprise by exhibiting signs of depression shortly after arriving in their host destination.

Best Practices
In the foreground graphic, a metal pole supports a yellow diamond-shaped road sign labeled “Funding” and below it, a green sign labeled “Univ Arizona, Duke University.” In the background photo, an inclining road with yellow double center lines rises towards reddish rocky hills below a hazy pink sky. Map markers show photo of a young white male student seated in a wheelchair with a dog in one and leaning against a camel in another

Funding Access to a Priceless Experience

That’s the idea behind many higher education institutions’ forward-thinking approach to ensuring that no disabled student is denied the opportunity to study abroad due to the costs of facilitating access.

Books and Journals
Asian-American youth stands under potted plants in Germany

A World Awaits You: Champions for Inclusion

3 Ways to Read this Issue of AWAY:

  • Online: Stay on this page to begin reading; click on linked prompts to advance to the next article.
  • Electronic files: Download the full issue in accessible PDF or Word formats by clicking under Documents, below.
Personal Stories
View of a Japanese classroom through a window; a teacher at a chalkboard

In and Out of the Japanese Classroom

Smiles spread on the Japanese storekeepers' faces as Jonathon, an obvious foreigner, asks them a question in their language. Jonathon, a University of Iowa graduate student who is spending a semester abroad, loves this interaction with the locals, both for absorbing the culture and practicing his Japanese language skills.

Personal Stories
Elana with a green hillside behind

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff: An Internship in Australia

From the beginning of her studies at Boston University, Elana knew she wanted field experience helping children with and without disabilities to lead healthy and fulfilling lives.

“I thought it would be cool to do an internship overseas because it would give me a unique perspective from another culture for my future career.”

So she looked into all her options, and took an active role in getting necessary accommodations for an internship while studying abroad in Australia for a semester.

Best Practices
Two women (one is Hannah) look over their shoulders smiling. Great Wall of China is visible behind them.

Scaling the Greatest Walls

How can you translate your campus' idealistic principles of inclusion to the global campus that is study abroad? In this best practice, adapted from her post to the UC Davis Study Abroad blog, Program Coordinator & Advisor Dana Armstrong ponders this challenge while reflecting on her experience advising a student who is blind traveling to China. Follow-up conversations with study abroad alumni with disabilities can put the realities more into perspective.

Best Practices
Four people representing different ethnic and racial groups

Using Multicultural Strategies to Increase Study Abroad

Not only should you recognize a good strategy when you see it, but you should take it and replicate it as much as you can. This is what Candace Chenoweth, the Director of Global Education at University of Wisconsin (UW)-Whitewater, sought to do. The Center of Global Education worked to not only increase, but exceed, the representation of multicultural students studying abroad, and then to do the same for students with disabilities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) students.

Best Practices
Image of a man and a woman standing outdoors in front of a window.

Scouting Out Accessibility Overseas

No two study abroad sites are ever quite the same, whether it's the vibrancy of the host community or the buzz of the host campus. The same can be said for how each country or host university includes and accommodates people with disabilities, as the local policies and resources can vary greatly. As University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s (UNC-CH) Study Abroad Advisor for Access, Lori Rezzouk helps foster better access to this vital information, which is key for students with disabilities who want to plan ahead for their adventures.

Best Practices
Kat Davis and Christie Johnson

Teamwork Makes the World Go Round

It’s time to think about how you and the program staff can become allies and work together. Hear from Kat Davis, West Campus Relations Manager CET Academic Programs and Christie Johnson, Senior Director, University Relations, Academic Programs International about what they do to make their study abroad programs inclusive and to collaborate with partners and students in the process.

Personal Stories
Xuan in her wheelchair outside Buckingham Palace

Using Vocational Rehabilitation for a Personal Assistant Abroad

What if your major is International Studies or your degree requires you to take classes overseas? How can you study abroad during your college experience, and pay for your personal assistant while traveling? These questions were always lingering in the background waiting to be answered for Xuan Troung, a student at North Carolina State University who has osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as brittle bone disease. To find the answers, she turned to her Vocational Rehabilitation counselor.

Tip Sheets

Dealing with Doubts

Alyssa Hillary, an Autistic student blogging about her study abroad experience in China, is having a successful time but the initial reaction from the overseas university would have made one think that was not possible.

“[Chinese administrators] said people like me shouldn’t go to college, and they tried to get the program to un-accept me, and they tried to have me sent home.”

Best Practices
Irene Scott talks to two students in her office

Leading by Example at Texas A&M

As a professional with a congenital hearing disability who has studied abroad and traveled to over ten countries, Irene Scott understands firsthand the challenges and rewards of sending students with disabilities abroad. It also places her in a unique position at the Study Abroad Programs Office at Texas A&M University: that of a confidante or role model to students with disabilities who seek overseas experiences of their own. 

Personal Stories
Michelle She in Germany

Why Parents Can Be Persuaded

When Michelle She started her first year of college in Tennessee far from her home in Maryland, her parents weren’t concerned about the distance or her year delay in starting. At least not in comparison to where she went the year before, and what she gained in return.

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