Resource Library

Personal Stories
A girl in library looks down at a book in her lap

Hitting the Books in Lithuania

Thanks to her self-advocacy prior to and during her travels, the potential pitfalls Paula experienced while studying abroad were manageable. She points to two challenges in particular:

One was that her Lithuanian professors would provide a list of 15 books as suggested reading and pull information from those books for tests.

"It was impossible to do all of that reading, because I’m such a slow reader. It was difficult knowing what they expected."

Personal Stories
View of a Japanese classroom through a window; a teacher at a chalkboard

In and Out of the Japanese Classroom

Smiles spread on the Japanese storekeepers' faces as Jonathon, an obvious foreigner, asks them a question in their language. Jonathon, a University of Iowa graduate student who is spending a semester abroad, loves this interaction with the locals, both for absorbing the culture and practicing his Japanese language skills.

Tip Sheets
A young man wearing a blazer stands mid-presentation before a screen with "Generation Study Abroad" projected onto it. Two women are seated next to him.

Presentation Slides on Disability and Study Abroad

If you attend conferences or host events related either to the disability community or study abroad field, why not bring the topic of people with disabilities going abroad into the fore? Let us get you started with Powerpoint slides ready to insert into your next presentation.

The slides cover:

Tip Sheets

FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities Combined, by Disability Type

Students with a physical disability, such as Cerebral Palsy and Short Stature, make up 40% of the more than 250 students with disabilities who have participated in the FLEX and YES programs since 2007. Blind and low vision students make up the next largest category of students with disabilities.

Tip Sheets

Students with Disabilities by Placement Organization

More than a dozen youth exchange organizations place FLEX and YES students with and without disabilities in U.S. host communities each year. Those that have placed the most students with disabilities? AFS USA, Program of Academic Exchange (PAX) and ASSE!

Tip Sheets

FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities by U.S. Host State

Which U.S. states have hosted the most students with disabilities? If you guessed states in the Midwest and Upper Midwest, you're right! Altogether, students with disabilities have been hosted in 43 U.S. states and the District of Columbia over the last ten years.

Personal Stories
Ana smiling in front of bookshelves at school library

Flying High to Study in the United States

At just 16 years old, Ana was so confident that she and her wheelchair would soon be on their way to the U.S., she told practically everyone she knew that she had applied to the Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

Although Ana didn’t make the final selection pool the first time, she tried again a year later.

"When I applied the second time, I didn’t tell anybody except my mom. Most of my family found out that I was going to fly two days before my flight when we had my farewell party. They were shocked!"

Tip Sheets
An international student from Asia in a power wheelchair wears a graduation cap and gown as he accepts his diploma.

Study at a U.S. College or University

On any campus, you are likely to find students, staff, and faculty with disabilities studying, working, and teaching alongside people without disabilities. Imagine yourself among them, then begin your path to U.S. study today!

Personal Stories
Pinar smiling in front of the New York City skyline

One Dream Leads to Another

Pinar, a Turkish high school student who is blind, received a full scholarship to study abroad on the U.S. Department of State’s Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) program. “Of course, my parents were really worried because my safety is important to them. Probably the most important thing!” says Pinar, reflecting on her experience. She lived with an American host family on weekends and stayed on campus at the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind during the week.

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