Resource Library

Personal Story
Wei at a parade

Ripple Effects 2.5: A Future Achieved through Deaf Rights

People with disabilities around the world achieve success in many ways. No one knows this better than Wei Wang, a deaf woman from China who has begun to tell their stories through her work as a documentarian. Passionate about creativity, Wei holds two masters degrees in documentary production and fine arts, both in American University. In our conversation, Wei told us about her adventures as a deaf international student, and the way that she has used her creativity to make her dreams come true. Listen Now on Soundcloud for this Ripple Effects podcast episode.

Personal Story
Island surrounded by clear blue body of water

Sharing Good Practices for Disability Inclusion in Indonesia

Growing up as someone who is deaf, with parents who were very involved in the disability community, Seth always felt a connection with disability, and he identifies that as a significant contributing factor in his overall life trajectory. Halfway through his time at IBM working in the finance department, he moved over to work on accessibility, and appreciated the work that he and his team accomplished together.

"I think that it is just a natural progression based on my upbringing and my passion."

Personal Story
Elana with a green hillside behind

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff: An Internship in Australia

From the beginning of her studies at Boston University, Elana knew she wanted field experience helping children with and without disabilities to lead healthy and fulfilling lives.

“I thought it would be cool to do an internship overseas because it would give me a unique perspective from another culture for my future career.”

So she looked into all her options, and took an active role in getting necessary accommodations for an internship while studying abroad in Australia for a semester.

Personal Story
Xuan in her wheelchair outside Buckingham Palace

Using Vocational Rehabilitation for a Personal Assistant Abroad

What if your major is International Studies or your degree requires you to take classes overseas? How can you study abroad during your college experience, and pay for your personal assistant while traveling? These questions were always lingering in the background waiting to be answered for Xuan Troung, a student at North Carolina State University who has osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as brittle bone disease. To find the answers, she turned to her Vocational Rehabilitation counselor.

Tipsheet
Hands on braille keyboard

Quick Tips for Accessible Web Forms

Address common accessibility issues by designing your web forms and documents to be accessible from the start! To check out how a webpage would be read to a blind individual using a screenreader, download the Fangs Screen Reader Emulator, a Firefox plugin. To try using a real screen reader, download NVDA for Windows.

Tipsheet
A group of women and men on laptops

Seven Steps for Setting Up an Accessible Virtual Exchange

  1. Know your toolbox. Many e-learning platforms and tools that are popular for virtual exchanges come equipped with various accessibility features, such as tools for embedding captions, screenreading compatibility, or keyboard navigation. Research which accessibility features are included in your platform of choice. If it offers little in the way of accessibility, either think through alternative methods for providing access or use a different platform.
Tipsheet
A teenage boy uses sign language with a person on a computer screen.

Accessible Virtual Exchanges

Virtual exchanges are growing more popular for sharing information and ideas across international borders. There is no precise formula to virtual exchanges, but they typically take the form of online cross-cultural courses between individuals, between classrooms, or between institutions around the world. Educational activities and dialogues may draw from video, audio, text, and social media.

Tipsheet
A woman and her PA in Brazil

Including Participants & Personal Assistants in Your Exchange Program

Although arranging and funding personal assistance services (PAS) for international exchange participants is not required (or only limited to program activities) by the Americans with Disabilities Act, many international exchange providers go beyond the law to ensure that a participant has appropriate services in place, recognizing that:

Personal Story
John Winn with saxophone

Music Around the World

When my jazz quartet and I drove to New York City to audition for a U.S. Department of State Jazz Ambassadors tour, we had no idea of what to expect. Expecting the unexpected turned out to be one of the best strategies, not only for the audition, but for a successful international exchange experience we were later selected to do. We were to travel to parts of the world that none of us had ever seen. What would the people think of our music? How westernized have the countries we would be visiting become?

Personal Story
Shannon in front of mountain vista with three other young women

"We Always Found a Way to Make it Work"

I always loved traveling around the United States with my family, but I decided that I wanted to get out of my comfort zone and travel abroad.