Resource Library

Tipsheet
Two young professional women in Jordan

The Role of Peer Support and Mental Health Abroad

Peer support is often underutilized but can be an effective safety net for many students learning to adjust and adapt to a new culture when studying abroad. Increasingly, study abroad programs are looking at ways to build in support systems and safety nets for all students, including training peers to support students with mental health conditions. Some programs focus on just 2 – 3 hours of a peer support curriculum while others offer 6-week programs that meet once per week prior to going abroad.

Personal Story
Shannon in front of mountain vista with three other young women

"We Always Found a Way to Make it Work"

I always loved traveling around the United States with my family, but I decided that I wanted to get out of my comfort zone and travel abroad.

Tipsheet
College students chat or study from books.

Standardized Tests and People with Disabilities

Applying to study, learn English, or get professional experience in the U.S.? You may be required to provide test scores as part of your application. Find out what kinds of disability-accommodations you may be able to receive when you take the TOEFL, SAT, GRE, and other tests.

Tipsheet
A woman in a red suitcoat listens intently to another woman talking

Health Insurance: 8 Steps for Exchange Advisors to Take

By removing health insurance barriers, you can support diverse students to safely participate in your international exchange programs.With these options in place, it shouldn’t prevent qualified individuals from participating in exchanges and alleviate some of the difficult health cost issues that exchange staff and students need to deal with during the program.

Tipsheet
Woman getting henna painted on the palm of her hand

Why Pre-Existing Conditions Matter in Insurance

Plans offered to international exchange participants for less than a year of coverage are not fully licensed products so changes to U.S. health laws through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) do not apply. These plans can increase costs, have pre-existing condition exclusions, or deny enrollment to an individual based on health status.

Tipsheet
Reading codes of conduct

Codes of Conduct and Exchange Participants with Disabilities

Having a disability does not exempt participants from the terms of the code of conduct (sometimes called behavior agreements) or from experiencing consequences for violating the code.

Providing all participants with site-specific information about the services and support available abroad can reduce the likelihood that a participant with a disability will violate a code of conduct.

For example:

Tipsheet
At the airport bag screener

Air Travel Tips for Autistic Passengers

If you've been to an airport before, you know that the variety of sounds, lights, and touch at the airport can result in sensory overload! Here's some tips on getting through security, and the bumps of the flight.

Tipsheet
A group of four women are communicating with each other in sign language.

Locating Sign Language Interpreters in Non-U.S. Countries

In some cases, international exchange programs who are supporting Deaf/Hard of Hearing U.S. citizens abroad may decide to hire sign language interpreters in the destination country. Benefits may include reduced costs and the use of interpreters who have a familiar knowledge of the local language, culture, and Deaf community. However, be aware that most in-country sign language interpreters are trained only in the sign language of that country.

The following resources may be useful to you in locating a sign language interpreter in a non-U.S. country.

Tipsheet
Two women using sign language

Developing an Interpreter Contract

Protect yourself and the needs of the interpreter by laying out expectations in advance of the international exchange program. Learn what to include in a contract.

Tipsheet
Two women are pictured. One of the women is showing the other how to form a particular sign.

Hiring Sign Language Interpreters

What skills and qualifications should you consider when hiring an interpreter for a Deaf or Hard of Hearing individual? Learn more: from certification and compatibility to travel and foreign language experience.

Tipsheet
A Deaf girl is in the middle of a sign and appears to be asking a question of someone out of the frame of the picture.

Locating Sign Language Interpreters in the U.S.

To find sign language interpreters, consider contacting interpreter referral services, interpreter training programs, speech and hearing centers, and Deaf schools and organizations.

Because exchange programs often involve long hours and unusual circumstances, interpreter fatigue can result in adverse effects on communication access for a Deaf or Hard of Hearing individual.

Tipsheet
In India, a beautiful scene of colors and candles is assembled on the ground.

Learning Disability Accommodations

Exchange professionals and faculty need to talk with the individual with the learning disability or attention deficit disorder and disability specialist to figure out what is needed as each person is different. If the individual does not have a learning disability diagnosis, then some of these practices may as be useful to try out to see if it helps to remediate issues the individual may be having.

Tipsheet
Rocks and sand are positioned in a zen garden.

What are Learning Disabilities?

Learning disability is an umbrella term used to describe a wide range of information processing disorders that affects learning. People with learning disabilities may have difficulties with reading, math, writing, spatial orientation or other skills that are not caused by or related to another condition or disability.

Tipsheet
Wheelchair lift in a chartered bus overseas

Finding the Funding to Meet Obligations

Many best practices for including people with disabilities start with making sure funds are available for disability-related accommodations in the international exchange program.

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