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Tip Sheets
In the foreground graphic, a metal pole supports a blue rectangular-shaped road sign labeled “Professional Development” and below it, a green sign labeled “Clearinghouse; MIUSA; US Dept of State; Bureau Educational & Cultural Affairs” with white arrows pointing in different directions. In the background photo, a highway viewed from high above winds through red, yellow and green foliage. Map marker graphic along an illustrated road contains a photo of a young man dressed formally speaking

Nexus of Champions

The champions for inclusive international experiences are out there—and you’re likely among them! Find out how a national project is bringing them together and building their capacity as change-makers.

It’s not always easy being a champion for disability inclusion in international education. However, finding allies can make all the difference for driving change at our own institutions and organizations. It can lead to building the critical mass needed to make a lasting impact in the field.

Tip Sheets
Young American man in the distance looking at some livestock in Norway

Including Exchange Participants with Traumatic Brain Injuries

In the right situation with the right supports, an individual with a traumatic brain injury can increase the boundaries of their potential while recovering abilities and a sense of identity.

A traumatic brain injury (TBI), in contrast to an intellectual disability or learning disability, is acquired through a blow or jolt to the head causing a disruption in brain function. It can involve reduced capacity in cognitive, sensory, physical, or psychosocial abilities, which previously might have been easy for the individual. 

Tip Sheets
Students sit at desks with teacher in front of board

Teaching Languages to Blind and Visually Impaired Students

Most language course work focuses on visual input as the main tool for teaching language. Students practice vocabulary by identifying pictures in the target language. Cultural curriculum focuses on the visual arts or landscapes. Exams ask students to match categories in corresponding lists.

Blind or visually impaired people benefit from language study in the same way as sighted students, but there are some key differences in the way that they learn. A multisensory approach to language teaching can help shift to a more inclusive environment.

Tip Sheets
3 people, one in a scooter talking

What Statistics Tell Us about People with Disabilities in International Exchange

Mobility International USA is always looking for surveys or research in the disability or international education fields that have the potential to shine a light on the participation and experiences of people with disabilities in international exchange. If surveys ask both "Do you have a disability?" and "Did you [study, volunteer, intern, teach, research] abroad?," then we do our best to request and report on the data, so we can all learn more from the findings.

Tip Sheets
four young people smiling

How to Welcome Staff and Interns with Disabilities to Your International Education Organization

Here, we asked people with disabilities to share their tips for what international education organizations can do to fill jobs, internships, or practicum positions with talented professionals and interns with disabilities. You might notice that many of these tips also apply to including people with disabilities as participants in your international exchange programs!

Tip Sheets
Group of students standing and some sitting on table working together.

Supporting Exchange Participants with Bulimia or Anorexia

An international exchange program can involve a change in nutritional routines, causing symtoms of Bulimia and Anorexia to develop or to spin out of control. It is possible though for participants with Bulimia or Anorexia to successfully complete international exchange, whether they come into the program with a diagnosed condition or if they develop symptoms after departure.

Tip Sheets
EducationUSA website snapshot that says "For International Students: U.S. Study Opportunities Abound"

EducationUSA: Your Official Source for U.S. Higher Education

EducationUSA Advisers around the world offer information, orientation, and guidance as you search for higher education institutions in the United States that fits your needs. EducationUSA makes applying to a U.S. college or university clear.

Tip Sheets
International students sitting and smiling on bleachers at sports game.

Accommodations for Non-Native English Speakers

“Do international students get extra time? Is being a non-native English speaker a disability?” This question comes up frequently from international students and disability service offices.  At first thought, many offices would easily say “no” and “no." Should it be that easy?

Many academic departments and student service offices may initially assume that issues arise solely from being a non-native English speaker, but it may also mean that a disability is not recognized, and a second look should be given to these students.

Tip Sheets
Word cloud featuring the phrase "Student with" surrounded by diverse types of disabilities

Track Students with Disabilities in Your Study Abroad Reporting

Through the Open Doors® survey compiled annually by the Institute on International Education, we have a general snapshot of how many U.S. college students with disabilities study abroad and their disability types. But until more U.S. higher education institutions respond with these disability statistics, we won't have a complete picture. Your institution is needed to bring the snapshot into greater focus!

To do this, help ensure that your institution responds to the Open Doors® survey, including its two questions about students with disabilities going abroad.

Tip Sheets
Faculty-led study abroad group to Italy

Knowing Your Rights and Responsibilities

It is important to know your rights, your responsibilities, and what is guiding the current practices of study abroad programs. There are good reasons for providing accommodations but you also need to look at the entire program to gauge accessibility and be clear and realistic about what programs can deliver.

Tip Sheets
Deaf female student from Malaysia stands in front of the Model Secondary School for the Deaf

High School Placements for Deaf Exchange Students

In the United States, the vast majority of secondary students with disabilities are mainstreamed in inclusive high schools per the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). First passed in 1975, the IDEA is a powerful landmark civil rights law that guarantees access to a free, appropriate, public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE) appropriate to every child with a disability.

Tip Sheets
Blind student and teacher smile while holding a hand puppet in a school hallway..

High School Placements for Blind and Low Vision Students

It used to be that the majority of blind and low vision exchange students were placed in schools for the blind in the United States. That is no longer the case. Experienced exchange professionals know that there is no one size fits all approach to placing these talented students in U.S. high schools.

In the United States, the vast majority of secondary students with disabilities are mainstreamed in public high schools.

Tip Sheets
High school students sit in a semi-circle in a classroom.

IEPs and 504 plans: Understanding the Difference

Youth with disabilities participate in high school exchange programs in the U.S. every year. Although many international students with disabilities will need few, if any, disability-related accommodations in the United States, others will need services and support to participate fully in their host schools. Students may receive services and support informally or through an IEP or 504 plan.

Tip Sheets
Narrow alleyway in Moroccan town

Changing Policies & Practices for Program Access

Rules and regulations that work for the majority of participants may need to be adjusted slightly to foster participation by participants with disabilities. Depending on the culture, some issues that may seem inconsequential, such as "Personal assistants are the responsibility of the individual to provide," can become rigid barriers. Changing these situations takes common sense and diplomacy. Sometimes a reasonable modification of policy will allow a participant with disabilities to fully engage in the program.

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