Resource Library

Tip Sheets
EducationUSA website snapshot that says "For International Students: U.S. Study Opportunities Abound"

EducationUSA: Your Official Source for U.S. Higher Education

EducationUSA Advisers around the world offer information, orientation, and guidance as you search for higher education institutions in the United States that fits your needs. EducationUSA makes applying to a U.S. college or university clear.

Tip Sheets
International student rides down a ramp using her wheelchair in front of the "International House Cafe".

7 Steps for #Access2USA

Step 1: Start Looking!

Remember that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) gives you the right to access educational programs offered on U.S. soil, so find an opportunity that fits your interest.

Step 2: Apply!

You have the right to an accessible application and admission process, if needed.  Many programs will allow you access to an advisor who will provide assistance.

Tip Sheets
Power wheelchair user with breathing machine seeks assistance from another person.

Tips on Traveling with a Ventilator or Breathing Machine

When traveling internationally, you may need electrical converters/adaptors for respiratory equipment. Also airline personnel may request detailed information about its operation and use. Know your settings and how to do basic setup and problem-solving, and learn other tips for traveling safely.

Tip Sheets
Power wheelchair user on a study abroad site visit in S. Korea

Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs

Faculty-led programs are yet another route that students with disabilities may choose in order to achieve their study abroad goals. This tipsheet covers how to adapt a program for accessibility, legal responsibilities, practices collected from faculty leaders, and links to examples of faculty-led handbooks and site accessibility forms.

Tip Sheets
College students chat or study from books.

Standardized Tests and People with Disabilities

Applying to study, learn English, or get professional experience in the U.S.? You may be required to provide test scores as part of your application. Find out what kinds of disability-accommodations you may be able to receive when you take the TOEFL, SAT, GRE, and other tests.

Tip Sheets
White labador guide dog walks beside its owner

Traveling Internationally with a Guide Dog or Service Animal

You are taking the leap to go abroad and naturally you want to bring along your service animal or guide dog on this adventure. However, you may wonder what arrangements will be needed. Or, if bringing your animal companion is a good idea or not. Feral dogs in the destination country and other considerations on how to keep your guide dog or service animal healthy overseas can help when deciding.

Tip Sheets
A young American man with autism presents to a classroom of Jamaican children.

What Should I Expect in an Exchange Program?

After doing some research and talking to his college study abroad advisor, Jeremiah Swisher learned that there are many different types of international exchange opportunities to choose from. "The group trip to teach in Jamaica over spring break seemed like the best fit for me because it wouldn't interrupt my schoolwork," he says."The idea of traveling with a group of people was much more comfortable than traveling alone."

How you decide which kind of exchange program depends on you and your preferences. What type of international experience would you prefer?

Tip Sheets
Megan close up in black and white, looking over her shoulder

Using Power Wheelchairs Abroad

As my fellow disabled travelers may know, total equipment failure can happen anywhere. While most people were reading the stories of Camilo José Cela on a warm bench surrounded by freesia, I spent the majority of my time getting down and dirty in the mechanic shops of Seville, Spain, where I was studying abroad for 8 months.

Tip Sheets
A young woman sits atop a wooly yak with a lake and mountains in the background.

Disability-Specific Preparations: From Fatigue to Sensitivities

Use these at-a-glance tips for going abroad with specific chronic health or systemic health conditions, such as chronic fatigue to environmental sensitivities and more. Don't forget to browse our resource library for more detailed advice on many of these topics!

Tip Sheets
Four students waiting at the airport

15 Tips for Planning an Autism-Inclusive Exchange Program

Help smooth the transition abroad for by implementing these inclusive ideas into the structure of a group exchange program. These tips, adapted from Autism Network International, can benefit exchange participants who are on the autism spectrum as well as those who are neurotypical.

Tip Sheets
Two young American women smile looking over their shoulders.

Prep for Your Disability

Three ways you can help make a smooth transition into your international exchange experience are disclosing your disability, being your own advocate, and determining disability accommodations for access.

Tip Sheets
An assortment of foreign currencies are scattered on a table.

Plan Your Expenses

Let's get started by building a list of potential expenses you may have when participating in an international exchange experience. From general fees to disability-related expenses. These expenses might be paid for in a number of ways, including through your own expenses, a school, an exchange program, vocational rehabilitation funding, scholarships, and more.

Tip Sheets
Rainbow and castle behind a young man

Autism & International Exchange Tips for Travelers

Have you ever felt like an anthropologist, having to figure out the social habits of those around you? Have you ever had to find new ways to communicate with other people, or had to interpret the slang or figures of speech used by other people? These can be common experiences for people on the autism spectrum, but they are also very common experiences for international exchange travelers! Why not be both?

Tip Sheets
African exchange participant touching a tactile wall while visiting FDR Memorial in Washington DC

How to Be Independent in the U.S. as a Blind Visitor

If you are blind or low vision, you will find Americans friendly and helpful but also may be confronted with U.S. expectations that you learn to navigate and live independently in your daily life. U.S. laws and community resources create opportunities to support your independence.

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