Resource Library

Tip Sheets
Four international students

Statistics: International Students who Use Disability Services Report Satisfaction

Seven percent of the international students to the U.S. said they use disability services, according to i-graduate's International Student Barometer.

The majority (89%) of these students reported they are satisfied with overall learning, living, and support services overseas. This is similar as other USA-destination international students in the survey who do not use disability services (90%).

Tip Sheets
Reading codes of conduct

Codes of Conduct and Exchange Participants with Disabilities

Having a disability does not exempt participants from the terms of the code of conduct (sometimes called behavior agreements) or from experiencing consequences for violating the code.

Providing all participants with site-specific information about the services and support available abroad can reduce the likelihood that a participant with a disability will violate a code of conduct.

For example:

Tip Sheets
Hard of Hearing woman asking a question

Negotiating Your Accommodations

Remember that you are your own expert on your disability and how it might impact your participation in international exchange! Recognize that the exchange professionals you are working with may not already be familiar with certain types of accommodations, disability resources, or a country’s level of accessibility. Help in doing thorough research and build effective communication on what access you need.

Tip Sheets
Exchange group with one person holding a white cane smiles for the camera.

Should I Take My Guide Dog or Service Animal?

As capable as you and your guide dog/service animal may be together, many people with disabilities find the amount of assistance they need when traveling goes up simply because some of the things they count on at home do not exist in this new environment.

Tip Sheets
Bahraini and American young men wearing traditional head scarves

Strategies for Addressing Cultural Disability Differences

By your very presence, and by your active participation in an international exchange experience, you can help challenge negative perceptions. People with disabilities who have traveled abroad have tried a variety of strategies.

Tip Sheets
White labador guide dog walks beside its owner

Traveling Internationally with a Guide Dog or Service Animal

You are taking the leap to go abroad and naturally you want to bring along your service animal or guide dog on this adventure. However, you may wonder what arrangements will be needed. Or, if bringing your animal companion is a good idea or not. Feral dogs in the destination country and other considerations on how to keep your guide dog or service animal healthy overseas can help when deciding.

Tip Sheets

Global Disability Culture 101

From country to country, you will find there are vastly different views on disability that are based on your ethnicity, religion, gender, socioeconomic status, religious beliefs, and disability type. Local politics, laws, geographic setting (rural versus urban), existing services for people with disabilities, and more add another layer of complexity to disability culture and identity.

Tip Sheets
A volunteer surrounded by kids

Volunteer Abroad

Whether you apply to participate in a volunteer abroad program like the Peace Corps or join a volunteer project abroad, volunteering can dramatically change your life and the lives of those around you. Since many volunteer organizations offer opportunities to work with disability communities overseas, people with disabilities can be valuable role models at these placement sites. As you consider your disability-related needs for a potential volunteer abroad experience, remember that many people with disabilities have successfully coordinated a variety of supports in order thrive in international volunteer settings.

Tip Sheets
Video Relay Service

Communication While Abroad for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

The technologies described below have proven useful for many Deaf and Hard of Hearing international exchange participants. Before you go, research your options, and whenever possible, try out different technologies to learn if they work for you!

Tip Sheets
At the airport bag screener

Air Travel Tips for Autistic Passengers

If you've been to an airport before, you know that the variety of sounds, lights, and touch at the airport can result in sensory overload! Here's some tips on getting through security, and the bumps of the flight.

Tip Sheets
A young American woman walks along a beach with a dog.

While You're Abroad: Tips by and for Autistic Travelers

Getting ready to land in your final destination? Take some advice from international exchange alumni on the autism spectrum about what they did overseas to make the transition abroad more smooth - and what they wish they had done.

Tip Sheets
A young American man with autism presents to a classroom of Jamaican children.

What Should I Expect in an Exchange Program?

After doing some research and talking to his college study abroad advisor, Jeremiah Swisher learned that there are many different types of international exchange opportunities to choose from. "The group trip to teach in Jamaica over spring break seemed like the best fit for me because it wouldn't interrupt my schoolwork," he says."The idea of traveling with a group of people was much more comfortable than traveling alone."

How you decide which kind of exchange program depends on you and your preferences. What type of international experience would you prefer?

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