Resource Library

Tipsheet
A Pakistani man and an American woman converse in sign language.

Common Funding Questions

We know you have many questions about how to fund international exchange: Does MIUSA provide scholarships? Are there scholarships for people with disabilities? What's the difference between scholarships and fellowships? We answer your burning funding questions.

News
A circular room shows photographs of the section 504 sit-ins with interactive technology.

Celebrating 28 Years of the ADA

Today marks the 28th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and we at MIUSA want to thank and celebrate the many disability activists, allies and organizations who took action to make it possible.

Their dedication and perseverance has enhanced the lives of millions of people with disabilities, both in the United States and globally. Many principles that were the basis for the ADA have been utilized when drafting and implementing disability laws and policies in countries around the world.

Event
Three women laugh and hug in an outdoor setting. Two wear colorful traditional clothing from their countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Gender, Disability and Development Institute 2019

The next GDDI will take place July 22-25, 2019. To request an invitation and to be notified when registration to GDDI 2019 opens, please fill out this short online form.

About GDDI

GDDI brings international development and human rights actors together with disabled women leaders from around the world to engage in direct dialogue about strategies for including women and girls with disabilities in development projects throughout the world.

Event
A student is fitted for an adaptive bike

Arrival Orientation for University Students with Disabilities

MIUSA hosted an arrival orientation in July 2018, for students participating in the Year of Exchange in America for Russians (YEAR) program. The students traveled to Eugene, Oregon, before embarking on a year of study at universities across the country.

The YEAR program provides an opportunity for students to live in the U.S. for a year while learning about American society, educating Americans about Russian history and culture, improving English speaking skills, strengthening knowledge in an academic field, and experiencing immersion in a local community.

Event
A large group of students pose, smiling, in a forest

Arrival Orientation for International High School Students

A warm MIUSA welcome to international exchange students from the Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) and Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) programs!

Twenty-eight high school exchange students with diverse disabilities traveled to Eugene, Oregon, in August. There, they experienced an orientation to help prepare them for their academic year in host communities across the United States.  

The students represent 19 countries accross the world, and are all recipients of prestigious scholarships from the U.S. Department of State.

Event
Three people group together smiling at camera. A young man in front holds open a magazine in which he is pictured.

Ambassadors of International Opportunities Exhibit at NCIL

From going abroad to hosting international visitors to working in international careers and more, participating in international exchange and citizen diplomacy opportunities can have a positive impact on a person’s employability, independent living skills, confidence, leadership, and other personal qualities.

Blog
Four women seated and talking and taking notes around a round table with a sign labeled "Loud Proud and Passionate, disabled women as leaders in inclusive development"

Full Circle Access at Gender 360 Summit

By Ashley Holben, Program Specialist

How do you get people with disabilities to the table? And is simply getting them to that proverbial table enough? What's the next step?

These are some of the questions we were thinking about when, for the first time (hopefully the first of many!), MIUSA had the opportunity to attend the Gender 360 Summit hosted by FHI 360, a member of MIUSA's EDDI initiative.

Event

Webinar: How to Volunteer, Intern or Work Abroad with a Disability

Abroad With Disabilities (AWD) and the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange (NCDE) answered your questions about the many ways that you can travel with a purpose and make your mark on the world. Learn about finding a program, paying for it, and self-advocacy!

Tipsheet
Two young women, one American and one Jordanian, lean towards each other in conversation.

Common Questions

"Can I go on a MIUSA exchange program?" "Which U.S. exchange program is right for me?" See if we answered your question about finding exchange opportunities in the U.S.

Event
Members of RightsNow and the Mexican organization MADIJAL sit at a conference table together during a planning meeting. Susei Grimes speaks into a microphone and is surrounded by at least five more women.

RightsNow! Activities in Mexico

The RightsNow! Consortium worked with partner organization MADIJAL in Guadalajara, Jalisco, México to bring together disability rights advocates, local government and the public sector to promote the rights of people with disabilities by increasing their access to legal resources and the justice system. The visit in April aimed to develop and strengthen cross-disability, cross-sector networks to address disability discrimination through implementation of the law.

Blog
Three young women stand on a high ledge facing out towards the view

Re-Defining the “Success” Story

International exchange is one of those experiences that can have high stakes for someone with a disability.

A disabled exchange participant might invest so much energy convincing others that nothing bad will happen if they go abroad, that it stings that much worse if an accident does occur. Worse still, even a minor incident might result in a program to question the participant’s abilities or to project doubts on future participants with disabilities.

Personal Story
Two young women walk together along a jungle path parallel to a beach. One woman is carrying a white cane.

The Right to Fall

In the summer of 2015 I left the creature comforts of Ohio behind for a study-abroad/volunteer program in one of the developing nations in the Caribbean. Having never traveled outside the United States before, I had only a vague idea what to expect. A few things weighed heavily on my mind as I took off from the airport in Cincinnati. I knew I was the first blind student to gain acceptance into my program. Before I applied, another had been denied entry because the administrators didn't believe her orientation and mobility skills were strong enough for her to handle the trip.

Pages