Resource Library

Tipsheet
An international student from Asia in a power wheelchair wears a graduation cap and gown as he accepts his diploma.

Study at a U.S. College or University

On any campus, you are likely to find students, staff, and faculty with disabilities studying, working, and teaching alongside people without disabilities. Imagine yourself among them, then begin your path to U.S. study today!

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A middle-aged woman addresses an audience while two younger women stand behind her to interpret in sign language. A screen behind them reads "Top Tips for English Language Learning."

Learn English

What motivates YOU to learn English? Whether it's to get a better job or to meet people around the world, take the first step to reach your goal. Join an English as a Second Language (ESL) program in the U.S. or online.

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A smiling blind man in a suit holds a cane while greeting a man in a formal suit.

Gain Professional Experience

Professional exchanges, such as internships and fellowships, provide opportunities for international visitors to gain career experience or to share their knowledge or skills while living in the United States. These exchanges can last from a few weeks to a few years. Many people with disabilities have traveled to the U.S. to gain career experience or to share their expertise in a variety of professional fields.

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Two women present a third women with a special award certificate.

Scholarships for U.S. Study

Most international students fund their U.S. studies through personal or family savings. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you and your family will have to pay using savings or loans. Learn the basic facts about scholarships, then browse examples of popular scholarship opportunities.

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Three international men with disabilities clap and cheer.

Funded Programs to the U.S.

Apply for a program that will cover your expenses to the U.S. as you advance your professional or academic goals.

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A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

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Two young women, one American and one Jordanian, lean towards each other in conversation.

Common Questions

"Can I go on a MIUSA exchange program?" "Which U.S. exchange program is right for me?" See if we answered your question about finding exchange opportunities in the U.S.

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A Pakistani man and an American woman converse in sign language.

Common Funding Questions

We know you have many questions about how to fund international exchange: Does MIUSA provide scholarships? Are there scholarships for people with disabilities? What's the difference between scholarships and fellowships? We answer your burning funding questions.

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A smiling Ghanaian woman is near a building and sign that reads "Vermont Center for Independent Living."

Disability Organizations in the U.S.

Many of the services provided by these organizations are available to every person with a disability, regardless of citizenship. Community-based and state-based disability organizations are especially helpful to international visitors who will not have access to disability services through a U.S. university or college.

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Screenshot of a webinar slide shows images of foreign currency and MIUSA logo.

Webinar: Finding Funding for U.S. Study and Exchange

Regardless of where in the world you live or what kind of disability you have, many opportunities exist to gain educational or professional experience in the U.S. Play a recording from a webinar introducing some of the top scholarships, fellowships, and other strategies for funding an international exchange in the United States. Captions are embedded within the video.

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Disability-Inclusive Youth Programs

Youth with disabilities are amongst the most marginalized and poorest of all the world’s youth. They commonly face more discrimination and severe social, economic, and civic disparities as compared with those without disabilities, especially in developing countries.

Yet, youth programs seldom address issues of youth with disabilities, much less include them into activities.

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Why Donate

Like many non-profit organizations, individual donors are critical to our work. Your support ensures that we can continue the life-changing work of advancing the rights of people with disabilites. Whether your donation supports a scholarship for a woman with a disability to become a new leader, or it makes it possible for a local family to host someone from another country, your donations are supporting the programs that make a real difference in the lives of disabled people worldwide.

 

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Blind woman from Ethiopia using adaptive voting device

Inclusive Democracy and Governance

Building inclusive, vibrant democracies depends on the active engagement of all citizens in public life. People with disabilities represent approximately 15% of the population, a large constituency base in every country, yet decision-makers and policy-makers in government have historically been unresponsive to their needs.

Through involvement in political activity, law and policy reform, disabled people and their organizations can influence improvements in the areas of health, rehabilitation, education, employment, and access to goods and services.

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WILD delegate from Kenya speaking with representative of international development organization

Partnership Building Strategies

So, you secured a meeting with a potential partner! Maybe it is with a representative from the US Embassy, USAID, an international development organization, or a local nonprofit. Here are a few things to keep in mind going into that meeting. This is a two way meeting, both about what you can do for them and what they can do for you; both about what you can offer and what they can bring to the table.

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Photo: Group of study abroad students with and without disaiblities overlooking mist in Costa Rica valley

Americans Going Abroad

Teach English at a primary school in Kenya. Study the culture of indigenous populations in Australia. Intern at an international human rights organization. Americans with all types of disabilities are expanding their world through international exchange.

Now’s your chance to explore the world. Where will you go?

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