Resource Library

Tipsheet
U.S. campus with brick buildings and trees.

Top 10 Disability Resources On-Campus

International students and scholars with disabilities can often find what they need at their U.S. colleges and universities. Do a bit of research to find out if your U.S. college or university offers these ten offices or departments, which can work with you to make sure that you have full access to everything you do at school, whether it's taking a test or participating in a club or event.

Tipsheet
A smiling Ghanaian woman is near a building and sign that reads "Vermont Center for Independent Living."

Disability Organizations in the U.S.

Many of the services provided by these organizations are available to every person with a disability, regardless of citizenship. Community-based and state-based disability organizations are especially helpful to international visitors who will not have access to disability services through a U.S. university or college.

Tipsheet
A Pakistani man and an American woman converse in sign language.

Common Funding Questions

We know you have many questions about how to fund international exchange: Does MIUSA provide scholarships? Are there scholarships for people with disabilities? What's the difference between scholarships and fellowships? We answer your burning funding questions.

Tipsheet
Two young women, one American and one Jordanian, lean towards each other in conversation.

Common Questions

"Can I go on a MIUSA exchange program?" "Which U.S. exchange program is right for me?" See if we answered your question about finding exchange opportunities in the U.S.

Tipsheet
A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

Tipsheet
Three international men with disabilities clap and cheer.

Funded Programs to the U.S.

Apply for a program that will cover your expenses to the U.S. as you advance your professional or academic goals.

Tipsheet
Two women present a third women with a special award certificate.

Scholarships for U.S. Study

Most international students fund their U.S. studies through personal or family savings. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you and your family will have to pay using savings or loans. Learn the basic facts about scholarships, then browse examples of popular scholarship opportunities.

Event
A teacher showing 3 international students a magnifier and iPad.

Turning to Technology for Global Access

For this year's CIEE annual conference, the theme looks at students today as having been "born digital":

They have never known a world without broadband internet, smartphones, or the ability to reach into their pocket for the answer to almost any question. They are resourceful researchers and future-focused pragmatists who fully expect to be successful on their own terms.

Tipsheet
A young Pakistani girl with no legs or hands digs in a garden alongside a pet cat.

Volunteer in the U.S.A.

Volunteerism, also known as community service, is highly valued in the United States. Anyone can be a volunteer, and many international visitors with disabilities have volunteered in their U.S. host communities. Although volunteer positions are unpaid, there are many possible benefits. Make a difference in your U.S. host community by volunteering your time and talent!

News
Justin standing with a coat and scarf, holding a white cane, in the middle of a food market.

Access Languages to Access Opportunities

"It's a stuffed bell pepper with rice, meat and different kinds of vegetables." My parents listened intently as I translated the waiter's explanation of this traditional Peruvian dish.

As a blind person, I was used to having a sighted intermediary explain the menu, and tell the waiter what I wanted. But this was different. Everything on the menu and all the conversation around us was in Spanish and I was the only one of our group who could understand it. I turn to the waiter and referring to my parents, I explained, "She'll have the stuffed bell pepper and he wants the soup."

Tipsheet
infographic of 3 circular images: 1) 3 students sitting at their desks arranged in a circle, 2) hand writing on a piece of paper with pencil, 3) 2 people speaking face to face.

Infographic: No-Cost Universal Design Examples

No-Cost! Universal Design Examples to Increase Access to Language Learning

From gathering information, to expressing ideas, and staying engaged – individuals learn in various ways.

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American man seated in a wheelchair extends his hand to two Chinese delegates.

People-to-People Exchanges

MIUSA implements short-term international exchange programs in the United States and abroad and has worked with over 2,300 alumni with and without disabilities from over 135 countries. These alumni leaders are part of a global MIUSA family. Our unique programs focus on youth, young adults, parents, professionals and women in a world where people with disabilities commonly face discrimination, barriers and isolation, especially as they become leaders. These alumni leaders are part of a global MIUSA family.

Tipsheet
A large group of international students laughing as they sit in a circle in their chairs in a classroom. There is a man typing in front of the circle and there is a woman to the right using hand gestures to signal to one student, as he looks to her using sign language.

Teaching Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students Language

Considerations:

While deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) students can face challenges with hearing and listening, their experiences are not generalizable. Some people who are completely deaf are still oral, while others prefer to use sign language. Others are nonsigning and prefer captions. Others simply have difficulty hearing, and can supplement their limited hearing with lipreading. What works for one person might not work for the next, so keep an open dialogue with your students.

Books/Journals/Podcasts
postcard graphic. Over a cartoon world map background reads "Greetings from Travelers Abroad: Life After Exchange" in stylized text. Inside each of the bubble letters of "Abroad" are photos of travelers with diverse disabilities exploring landmarks, speaking or signing, and working

Ripple Effects Season 3: #LifeAfterExchange

Ripple Effects: Travelers with Disabilities Abroad is a podcast brought to you by the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange, a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by MIUSA. Enjoy vivid stories from people with disabilities going abroad and the positive impact these experiences have on demonstrating what is possible.

Listen Now for available episodes for Season 3 on SoundCloud. Access transcripts for each episode from the Table of Contents.

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