Resource Library

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Scholarships for U.S. Study

Most international students fund their U.S. studies through personal or family savings. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you and your family will have to pay using savings or loans. Learn the basic facts about scholarships, then browse examples of popular scholarship opportunities.

A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

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Common Funding Questions

We know you have many questions about how to fund international exchange: Does MIUSA provide scholarships? Are there scholarships for people with disabilities? What's the difference between scholarships and fellowships? We answer your burning funding questions.

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Disability Organizations in the U.S.

Many of the services provided by these organizations are available to every person with a disability, regardless of citizenship. Community-based and state-based disability organizations are especially helpful to international visitors who will not have access to disability services through a U.S. university or college.


Why Donate

Like many non-profit organizations, individual donors are critical to our work. Your support ensures that we can continue the life-changing work of advancing the rights of people with disabilites. Whether your donation supports a scholarship for a woman with a disability to become a new leader, or it makes it possible for a local family to host someone from another country, your donations are supporting the programs that make a real difference in the lives of disabled people worldwide.


Blind woman from Ethiopia using adaptive voting device

Inclusive Democracy and Governance

Building inclusive, vibrant democracies depends on the active engagement of all citizens in public life. People with disabilities represent approximately 15% of the population, a large constituency base in every country, yet decision-makers and policy-makers in government have historically been unresponsive to their needs.

Through involvement in political activity, law and policy reform, disabled people and their organizations can influence improvements in the areas of health, rehabilitation, education, employment, and access to goods and services.

WILD delegate from Kenya speaking with representative of international development organization

Partnership Building Strategies

So, you secured a meeting with a potential partner! Maybe it is with a representative from the US Embassy, USAID, an international development organization, or a local nonprofit. Here are a few things to keep in mind going into that meeting. This is a two way meeting, both about what you can do for them and what they can do for you; both about what you can offer and what they can bring to the table.

International education advisor and woman with disability from Africa in traditional dress

Build Capacity in Your Organization

We believe the first step is face-to-face contact between people with disabilities and professionals in international exchange and international development. We do this through our trainings, events, and exchanges.

By tapping into the international community, people with disabilities can build expertise and skills needed for advocating for human rights and social justice.

A young Pakistani man in a suit stands in front of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Your Rights and Responsibilities

In recent U.S. history, disability rights activists have fought to ensure that every person with a disability may have the opportunity to live up to his or her full potential. While you are in the U.S., you will benefit from the same disability rights possessed by U.S. citizens with disabilities, and you will also be expected to fulfill certain responsibilities.

U.S. campus with brick buildings and trees.

Top 10 Disability Resources On-Campus

International students and scholars with disabilities can often find what they need at their U.S. colleges and universities. Do a bit of research to find out if your U.S. college or university offers these ten offices or departments, which can work with you to make sure that you have full access to everything you do at school, whether it's taking a test or participating in a club or event.

Buildings under construction

Disability and Humanitarian Assistance

Disability inclusion in all phases of emergency response and preparedness is crucial, from disaster risk reduction preparedness, prevention and mitigation to disaster relief, rehabilitation and recovery. Utilize the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to ensure international cooperation provides accessible and inclusive humanitarian responses.

A group of students from different countries, including a student in a wheelchair, share a group hug.

Find a Program in the U.S.

Find opportunities to study, learn, and grow professionally in the U.S., whatever your disability. Your options are endless. As a person with a disability, you have the same right as everyone else to gain professional experience, study at a college or high school, learn English, or volunteer in the U.S.

A young Latin American blind woman exits a public bus as a sighted American woman guides her.

Getting What You Need in the U.S.

If you come to the U.S. on a professional program, internship, or cultural exchange, you will need to find resources and services in your U.S. host community that can meet your disability-related needs. International students, scholars and teachers can access disability services at their U.S. school but will sometimes need to find community resources, too.