Resource Library

Personal Story
Group photo of people from different countries with different disabilities, many in traditional dress

Finding Her Stride in a New International Career

Rebecca Berman is about to achieve a significant milestone: her one-year anniversary working with World Learning is fast approaching. Since learning about the organization's work in international education and development as well as its commitment to disability inclusion, Rebecca knew it would be a good fit for her. Over the past year, she has come to appreciate the importance of finding balance in various aspects of her work.

Personal Story
Tory Sampson in front of a colorful Mosque

Travel Your Heart Out

In one of the remaining Arabic fishing villages on the coast of Israel, Jisr Az’Zarqa, Tory Sampson and her best friend found themselves in a rundown, corrugated steel restaurant. It had “the most amazing” fish dishes. Afterwards, they wandered into a shisha (hookah) bar, and ended up watching a soccer game between Barcelona and Real Madrid with the locals. For Tory, who was studying abroad in Israel for seven months, this day offered up a surreal moment still vivid in her mind. Yet, it is just one of many memories in Israel and beyond.

Tipsheet
Deaf female student from Malaysia stands in front of the Model Secondary School for the Deaf

High School Placements for Deaf Exchange Students

In the United States, the vast majority of secondary students with disabilities are mainstreamed in inclusive high schools per the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). First passed in 1975, the IDEA is a powerful landmark civil rights law that guarantees access to a free, appropriate, public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE) appropriate to every child with a disability.

Tipsheet
Young foreign student with mobility disability talks with an advisor

Knowing What Disability Questions to Ask: Sample Accommodations Forms

Are you advising someone with a disability who is traveling abroad for your volunteer, study or professional program? Do you know what questions to ask to assist them in preparing for travel and living abroad related to their disability?

These access information forms provide starting points to learn more about what may be needed. The advisor guidelines also help know what the individual's responses may mean and what follow-up questions you could ask. Download and adapt these for your own use; it may mean asking fewer questions on the forms and more in face to face conversations.

Best Practice
Irene Scott talks to two students in her office

Leading by Example at Texas A&M

As a professional with a congenital hearing disability who has studied abroad and traveled to over ten countries, Irene Scott understands firsthand the challenges and rewards of sending students with disabilities abroad. It also places her in a unique position at the Study Abroad Programs Office at Texas A&M University: that of a confidante or role model to students with disabilities who seek overseas experiences of their own. 

Personal Story
Haben Grima with friends

Building a Foundation for Future Excellence

Growing up, Haben Girma knew that international exchange was bound to be in her future. She had visited Eritrea and Ethiopia, places her parents called home before immigrating to the United States. So when Haben learned about BuildOn (www.buildon.org) as a teenager, she was determined to go. She was excited about BuildOn’s mission of empowering and educating youth by building schools in some of the world’s poorest remote communities and knew first-hand the importance of access to education.

Personal Story
Muhammad gives two thumbs up as he gets set up on a recumbent bicycle.

Like Father, Like Son

When Muhammad, a U.S. Department of State-funded Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) student from Pakistan, first arrived in the United States, he had no idea what to expect. But, he brimmed with excitement at the opportunity to experience life in America. His exchange experience was unique because he would be experiencing true immersion in not just one, but two non-native languages: English and American Sign Language (ASL).

Personal Story
View of the Arc de Triomphe on a bright day

Tracing the Steps of a Deaf Leader through France

As a teacher at the Wisconsin School for the Deaf, my students started a project to assist their peers who struggle with reading. Although my students are fluent English readers, the vast majority of the school’s freshmen students are English Language Learners who cannot read at the 9th grade level, which makes novels used for course curricula inaccessible to them.

Tipsheet
Student wearing a hearing aid writing in a classroom with other students.

English Testing for High School Students with Disabilities

Before they arrive in the U.S. for a life-changing cultural immersion experience, prospective high school exchange students from around the world are expected to demonstrate their level of English ability, usually by taking a standardized test. Whichever test you use to assess your applicants, learn how to adapt it to fairly and accurately measure the skills of students with disabilities.

Tipsheet
Video Relay Service

Communication While Abroad for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

The technologies described below have proven useful for many Deaf and Hard of Hearing international exchange participants. Before you go, research your options, and whenever possible, try out different technologies to learn if they work for you!

Tipsheet
A group of four women are communicating with each other in sign language.

Locating Sign Language Interpreters in Non-U.S. Countries

In some cases, international exchange programs who are supporting Deaf/Hard of Hearing U.S. citizens abroad may decide to hire sign language interpreters in the destination country. Benefits may include reduced costs and the use of interpreters who have a familiar knowledge of the local language, culture, and Deaf community. However, be aware that most in-country sign language interpreters are trained only in the sign language of that country.

The following resources may be useful to you in locating a sign language interpreter in a non-U.S. country.

Tipsheet
Two women using sign language

Developing an Interpreter Contract

Protect yourself and the needs of the interpreter by laying out expectations in advance of the international exchange program. Learn what to include in a contract.

Tipsheet
Two women are pictured. One of the women is showing the other how to form a particular sign.

Hiring Sign Language Interpreters

What skills and qualifications should you consider when hiring an interpreter for a Deaf or Hard of Hearing individual? Learn more: from certification and compatibility to travel and foreign language experience.

Tipsheet
A Deaf girl is in the middle of a sign and appears to be asking a question of someone out of the frame of the picture.

Locating Sign Language Interpreters in the U.S.

To find sign language interpreters, consider contacting interpreter referral services, interpreter training programs, speech and hearing centers, and Deaf schools and organizations.

Because exchange programs often involve long hours and unusual circumstances, interpreter fatigue can result in adverse effects on communication access for a Deaf or Hard of Hearing individual.

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