Resource Library

Tipsheet

Career Opportunities with EDDI Member Organizations

The organizations below are members of MIUSA's Excellence in Development and Disability Inclusion (EDDI) initiative, committed to inclusion and diversity both in the work that they do and in their teams. Because more people with disabilities are needed in international development careers, we highly encourage people with disabilities to explore their careers pages to find information about current jobs, internships, fellowships and other opportunities in the United States and around the world.

Tipsheet
Inclusive HIV/AIDs clinic in Africa

Implementing Inclusive HIV/AIDS Programs

Many factors contribute to the increased risk that people with disabilities experience for contracting HIV/AIDS, and to the fact that individuals with disabilities who also have HIV/AIDS often lack appropriate information and access to treatment.  In turn, without appropriate teatment, HIV/AIDS can result in secondary disabilities. HIV/AIDS programmers should seek out training and resources to ensure their activities are disability-inclusive.

Tipsheet
Protest signs say Put People First. Your Attitude May be My Barrier

Showing Respect by Being Direct

How can international professionals best address the needs of persons with disabilities? It all begins with communication, and that means being direct, asking questions, and using disability-positive language.

Tipsheet
Smiling women at a disability rights training in Tanzania

Eight Ways DPOs Can Mainstream Gender

Achieving equality for people with disabilities depends on an empowered civil society that actively demands rights, transparency, and accountability from the government. For Disabled Peoples Organizations (DPOs) to be most effective in their advocacy, they must include the diversity of the disability community, and tap into the power of disabled women leaders.

Tipsheet
African women talking in a circle

Women’s Health, Wellness and Violence Prevention

Women and girls with disabilities face double discrimination based on disability and gender. They are more likely to experience violence, abuse, and poor health than men with disabilities. They are less likely to have opportunities for education and employment, or access to critical services such as disaster aid or HIV&AIDS prevention programs.

If women and girls with disabilities are so vulnerable to human rights violations, why, then, are so many of them being excluded from the life-saving and life-enhancing development programs that exist in their communities?

Tipsheet
Group of Blind Moroccan girls

Disability-Inclusive Youth Programs

Youth with disabilities are amongst the most marginalized and poorest of all the world’s youth. They commonly face more discrimination and severe social, economic, and civic disparities as compared with those without disabilities, especially in developing countries.

Yet, youth programs seldom address issues of youth with disabilities, much less include them into activities.

Tipsheet
Buildings under construction

Disability and Humanitarian Assistance

Disability inclusion in all phases of emergency response and preparedness is crucial, from disaster risk reduction preparedness, prevention and mitigation to disaster relief, rehabilitation and recovery. Utilize the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to ensure international cooperation provides accessible and inclusive humanitarian responses.

Tipsheet
Black and white photo of people, including several women wheelchair users, sitting in a circle listening to a speaker.

Economic Inclusion

People with disabilities in developing countries often represent the poorest of the poor, yet they are typically overlooked in the development agenda. Poverty reduction strategies must include people with disabilities to achieve development goals.

Economic development programs such as microfinance have revolutionized efforts to fight poverty by providing financial services to people previously conceived as dependent on charity. Such financial services have empowered and enabled people, particularly women, to take control of their lives and contribute to their societies.

Tipsheet
Blind woman from Ethiopia using adaptive voting device

Inclusive Democracy and Governance

Building inclusive, vibrant democracies depends on the active engagement of all citizens in public life. People with disabilities represent approximately 15% of the population, a large constituency base in every country, yet decision-makers and policy-makers in government have historically been unresponsive to their needs.

Through involvement in political activity, law and policy reform, disabled people and their organizations can influence improvements in the areas of health, rehabilitation, education, employment, and access to goods and services.

Tipsheet
Two women in manual wheelchairs holding hands up in the air, one from Indonesia, the other from Bangladesh

The Power of Disabled Women Activists

Women with disabilities are among the most marginalized, under-served populations in the world, yet they offer tremendous potential for leadership and to transform communities. There are many ways development organizations can ensure women with disabilities are included. Here are five starting points.

Tipsheet
Blind man with international group

Making Inclusive Development a Reality

Inclusive development is good development. Learn ten essential strategies from incorporating inclusion of people with disabilities in one's budget or as scoring criterion in project proposals.

Tipsheet
WILD woman in a wheelchair holding arms up in success. Photo by Brian Lanker

Celebrating the Brilliant and Resilient Photo Exhibit

The Brilliant & Resilient project features a collection of photographs and personal stories of 50 women with different types of disabilities representing 41 countries. Their powerful portraits and vignettes illustrate the issues that significantly impact their lives, including access to education, employment, political power, reproductive health services, and HIV/AIDS and violence prevention.

Tipsheet
a portable ramp with handrails

Inaccessible? Ramp it!

The slope of a ramp should be no greater than 1:12, which is 12 feet (or meters) of horizontal ramp for every 1 foot (or meter) of vertical height. Some people with disabilities can use personal ramps that are shorter and steeper than 1:12. Before building a short ramp to provide access for a person with a disability, discuss whether a steeper ramp would work for that individual.