Resource Library

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Two young women, one American and one Jordanian, lean towards each other in conversation.

Common Questions

"Can I go on a MIUSA exchange program?" "Which U.S. exchange program is right for me?" See if we answered your question about finding exchange opportunities in the U.S.

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A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

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Three international men with disabilities clap and cheer.

Funded Programs to the U.S.

Apply for a program that will cover your expenses to the U.S. as you advance your professional or academic goals.

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Two women present a third women with a special award certificate.

Scholarships for U.S. Study

Most international students fund their U.S. studies through personal or family savings. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you and your family will have to pay using savings or loans. Learn the basic facts about scholarships, then browse examples of popular scholarship opportunities.

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A young Pakistani girl with no legs or hands digs in a garden alongside a pet cat.

Volunteer

"The best and most memorable and valuable part of my American experience was volunteering because I felt useful," says Esma, an exchange student from Georgia who is blind. "I felt that I was doing something for the community, not only that the community was doing something for me."

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A smiling blind man in a suit holds a cane while greeting a man in a formal suit.

Gain Professional Experience

Professional exchanges, such as internships and fellowships, provide opportunities for international visitors to gain career experience or to share their knowledge or skills while living in the United States. These exchanges can last from a few weeks to a few years. Many people with disabilities have traveled to the U.S. to gain career experience or to share their expertise in a variety of professional fields.

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A high school girl wearing a headscarf and sitting in a wheelchair rides the lift to board a yellow school bus.

Study at a U.S. High School

"American school is so neat, " signs Belvion, a Deaf exchange student from Mozambique who communicates using sign language. "They've got libraries and computers and the teachers are great. I'm loving it."

Belvion is one of the many high school students with disabilities who come to the United States every year to live and study on an exchange program. Are you ready to be an exchange student too?

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A middle-aged woman addresses an audience while two younger women stand behind her to interpret in sign language. A screen behind them reads "Top Tips for English Language Learning."

Learn English

What motivates YOU to learn English? Whether it's to get a better job or to meet people around the world, take the first step to reach your goal. Join an English as a Second Language (ESL) program in the U.S. or online.

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Collection of foreign currency.

Find Exchange Funding to the U.S.

Visa fees, airfare, health insurance, tuition, test fees, housing... International exchange expenses to the U.S. can add up quickly! Are you prepared?

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A group of students from different countries, including a student in a wheelchair, share a group hug.

Find a Program in the U.S.

Find opportunities to study, learn, and grow professionally in the U.S., whatever your disability. Your options are endless. As a person with a disability, you have the same right as everyone else to gain professional experience, study at a college or high school, learn English, or volunteer in the U.S.

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An international student from Asia in a power wheelchair wears a graduation cap and gown as he accepts his diploma.

Study at a U.S. College or University

On any campus, you are likely to find students, staff, and faculty with disabilities studying, working, and teaching alongside people without disabilities. Imagine yourself among them, then begin your path to U.S. study today!

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Garrett Brumfield in his scooter interacts with young children in a Cyprus street.

Interconnected through Experiential Exchanges Infographic

Explore the World. Create Access. Volunteer. Intern. Teach. Perform. Be a Part of the Circle of Change.

[Graphic: Three circles with one circle including www.miusa.org/ncde and two circles showing photos of American exchange participants with disabilities.]

Post It!

Share on Facebook, Share on LinkedIn, Share via Email

Experience. Connect. Learn. Share. Go Abroad. You Won’t Regret it. www.miusa.org/ncde

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foreign currency

How to Fund an Experience of a Lifetime

You’re probably thinking, “Wait, I have to pay to volunteer or work abroad?” It may seem counterintuitive, but keep in mind that there are significant costs for programs to send, train, and support participants abroad. Typically, U.S. sending organizations, participants, and host country partners work together to share these costs.

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Volunteer to India smiles widely with arched entryways behind

What’s Your Volunteer Abroad Style?

To make the most out of your service abroad, it’s important to carefully examine your interests and skills, and your openness to partner with community members abroad who will have different perspectives. While it is not your role as a volunteer abroad to swoop in and save the day by helping others, neither should it be a situation where you are sidelined from participating because no one thought to plan for disability access. After all, interdependent partnerships rely on recognizing the contributions of everyone.

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International students sitting and smiling on bleachers at sports game.

Accommodations for Non-Native English Speakers

“Do international students get extra time? Is being a non-native English speaker a disability?” This question comes up frequently from international students and disability service offices.  At first thought, many offices would easily say “no” and “no." Should it be that easy?

Many academic departments and student service offices may initially assume that issues arise solely from being a non-native English speaker, but it may also mean that a disability is not recognized, and a second look should be given to these students.

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