Resource Library

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An international student from Asia in a power wheelchair wears a graduation cap and gown as he accepts his diploma.

Study at a U.S. College or University

On any campus, you are likely to find students, staff, and faculty with disabilities studying, working, and teaching alongside people without disabilities. Imagine yourself among them, then begin your path to U.S. study today!

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A middle-aged woman addresses an audience while two younger women stand behind her to interpret in sign language. A screen behind them reads "Top Tips for English Language Learning."

Learn English

What motivates YOU to learn English? Whether it's to get a better job or to meet people around the world, take the first step to reach your goal. Join an English as a Second Language (ESL) program in the U.S. or online.

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A high school girl wearing a headscarf and sitting in a wheelchair rides the lift to board a yellow school bus.

Study at a U.S. High School

"American school is so neat, " signs Belvion, a Deaf exchange student from Mozambique who communicates using sign language. "They've got libraries and computers and the teachers are great. I'm loving it."

Belvion is one of the many high school students with disabilities who come to the United States every year to live and study on an exchange program. Are you ready to be an exchange student too?

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A smiling blind man in a suit holds a cane while greeting a man in a formal suit.

Gain Professional Experience

Professional exchanges, such as internships and fellowships, provide opportunities for international visitors to gain career experience or to share their knowledge or skills while living in the United States. These exchanges can last from a few weeks to a few years. Many people with disabilities have traveled to the U.S. to gain career experience or to share their expertise in a variety of professional fields.

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Two women present a third women with a special award certificate.

Scholarships for U.S. Study

Most international students fund their U.S. studies through personal or family savings. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you and your family will have to pay using savings or loans. Learn the basic facts about scholarships, then browse examples of popular scholarship opportunities.

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Three international men with disabilities clap and cheer.

Funded Programs to the U.S.

Apply for a program that will cover your expenses to the U.S. as you advance your professional or academic goals.

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A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

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Two young women, one American and one Jordanian, lean towards each other in conversation.

Common Questions

"Can I go on a MIUSA exchange program?" "Which U.S. exchange program is right for me?" See if we answered your question about finding exchange opportunities in the U.S.

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Close up of two people with one person supporting the other

Ups & Downs of International Travel

Managing your mental health while studying abroad – whether or not you have a history of anxiety, depression, or other mental health conditions – is something every person must think about when going abroad.

Being away from usual stress at home can sometimes be a relief when abroad; experiencing new adventures can be a useful distraction. You will also have times when you feel confused, uncomfortable, annoyed, and many of the same emotions that you manage in your daily life at home. 

Here's some suggestions for understanding what is going on.

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Recruiter is talking with a young black woman who is power wheelchair user

10 Recruitment Tips to Attract People with Disabilities

You want more people with disabilities in your international programs but they are not applying! What can you do to encourage more participation? Here's 10 ways to boost interest and ensure they not only apply but make it through the process to participate.

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Hand of someone reading braille on the edge of a public bus posted schedule

Can I Get Braille Where I'm Going?

You need to access the same information as everyone else who is on your exchange program or when navigating your new adventures overseas. The differences from home may mean you need to learn contracted Braille or how to access foreign languages in braille. And how will your technology work abroad?

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Webinar: Find Funding for International Study & Exchange

Many opportunities exist for Americans with disabilities to gain educational and professional experience around the world. Jump in on MIUSA's webinar introducing some of the top scholarships, fellowships, and other strategies for funding your international exchange experience. This webinar recording is captioned.

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MIUSA delegate by the Dead Sea in Jordan

Where Should I Go Abroad? Well, it Depends

The criteria of what makes a place a good fit for someone with a disability is also what makes a place good for someone without a disability. However, for many people with disabilities, this question taps into fundamental issues of rights and personal choice.

You have the right to study in an historic town with cobblestones that make for a bumpy wheelchair ride or a world famous city like Bangkok where the traffic patterns seemingly pose a risk for someone who is blind. People with disabilities live in every community, so there is no “best country”.

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A group of young Americans and exchange students with and without disabilities talk while walking through a college campus.

"I Got In! Now What?": Preparing for Study in the U.S.

It's official: You're well on your way to your U.S. studies. Now is the time to notify the school's disability office about your disability-related needs, search for financial aid, and learn about visa rules and regulations.

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A group of male international college students communicate in sign language. One wears a Gallaudet t-shirt.

Finding the Right College or University for You

Any college or university is a potential match for an international student or scholar with a disability. Learn which factors to consider when browsing institutions, and follow next steps for applying to your dream school.

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