Resource Library

Tip Sheets
International students sitting and smiling on bleachers at sports game.

Accommodations for Non-Native English Speakers

“Do international students get extra time? Is being a non-native English speaker a disability?” This question comes up frequently from international students and disability service offices.  At first thought, many offices would easily say “no” and “no." Should it be that easy?

Many academic departments and student service offices may initially assume that issues arise solely from being a non-native English speaker, but it may also mean that a disability is not recognized, and a second look should be given to these students.

Tip Sheets
A women using a wheelchair speaks into a microphone in front of a TV camera.

Adding Social Activism to Your Advocacy Plan

How do you get disability rights laws enforced in a country where other laws are equally not enforced? This is a central topic for the global disability rights movement in the 21st century as many countries lack enforcement of laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities or lack disability-related laws all together. It’s not only laws that make change but sometimes we need social activism through theater, writing, comedy, and other means to start the social change that then makes laws more able to be implemented and relevant to society.

Tip Sheets
Inclusive HIV/AIDs clinic in Africa

Implementing Inclusive HIV/AIDS Programs

Many factors contribute to the increased risk that people with disabilities experience for contracting HIV/AIDS, and to the fact that individuals with disabilities who also have HIV/AIDS often lack appropriate information and access to treatment.  In turn, without appropriate teatment, HIV/AIDS can result in secondary disabilities. HIV/AIDS programmers should seek out training and resources to ensure their activities are disability-inclusive.

Tip Sheets
Smiling women at a disability rights training in Tanzania

Eight Ways DPOs Can Mainstream Gender

Achieving equality for people with disabilities depends on an empowered civil society that actively demands rights, transparency, and accountability from the government. For Disabled Peoples Organizations (DPOs) to be most effective in their advocacy, they must include the diversity of the disability community, and tap into the power of disabled women leaders.

Tip Sheets
Students with disabilities working in a community garden

Investing in Youth with Disabilities

Disabled People's Organizations (DPOs) must engage, prioritize and invest in the potential of youth with disabilities to become positive, powerful citizens and advocates. Many of you are working on implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Tip Sheets
Buildings under construction

Disability and Humanitarian Assistance

Disability inclusion in all phases of emergency response and preparedness is crucial, from disaster risk reduction preparedness, prevention and mitigation to disaster relief, rehabilitation and recovery. Utilize the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) to ensure international cooperation provides accessible and inclusive humanitarian responses.

Tip Sheets
Black and white photo of people, including several women wheelchair users, sitting in a circle listening to a speaker.

Economic Inclusion

People with disabilities in developing countries often represent the poorest of the poor, yet they are typically overlooked in the development agenda. Poverty reduction strategies must include people with disabilities to achieve development goals.

Economic development programs such as microfinance have revolutionized efforts to fight poverty by providing financial services to people previously conceived as dependent on charity. Such financial services have empowered and enabled people, particularly women, to take control of their lives and contribute to their societies.

Tip Sheets
WILD delegate from Kenya speaking with a representative of an international development organization

Partnership Building Strategies

So, you secured a meeting with a potential partner! Maybe it is with a representative from the US Embassy, USAID, an international development organization, or a local nonprofit. Here are a few things to keep in mind going into that meeting. This is a two-way meeting, both about what you can do for them and what they can do for you; about what you can offer and what they can bring to the table.

Tip Sheets
Two women signing. Photo by Melissa Mankins

5 Ways to Build Your Professional Experience

You know professional development is valuable for individuals and organizations, but how do you fit skill building into your organization’s already tight budget and work load? Consider using these five strategies to start making connections and securing funding to build staff skills and increase organizational impact.

Tip Sheets
Susan Sygall publicly thanking two individuals

Tips from Grant Funders

Several international NGO professionals share their top tips for disability rights organizations worldwide on building relationships with grant funders. From collaborating with other DPOs to building strong partnerships for grant proposals to being realistic and clear about what you can and cannot do, read on for tips on each stage of the grant process.

Tip Sheets
A woman from Myanmar, who has cerebral palsy, bowing in a fashion show in traditional dress

Moving from Inclusion to Infiltration

Begin a new strategy of working toward inclusion by practicing “infiltration” - proactively participating in the services which, as members of your communities, are rightfully yours.

Billions of foreign assistance dollars are allocated toward improving communities through programs such as, entrepreneurship and job training, microfinance, health, education, political participation, emergency response, food security, water and sanitation, leadership training, and women and girls empowerment. These are your programs.

Tip Sheets
WILD woman in a wheelchair holding arms up in success. Photo by Brian Lanker

Celebrating the Brilliant and Resilient Photo Exhibit

The Brilliant & Resilient project features a collection of photographs and personal stories of 50 women with different types of disabilities representing 41 countries. Their powerful portraits and vignettes illustrate the issues that significantly impact their lives, including access to education, employment, political power, reproductive health services, and HIV/AIDS and violence prevention.