Resource Library

Tipsheet
U.S. campus with brick buildings and trees.

Top 10 Disability Resources On-Campus

International students and scholars with disabilities can often find what they need at their U.S. colleges and universities. Do a bit of research to find out if your U.S. college or university offers these ten offices or departments, which can work with you to make sure that you have full access to everything you do at school, whether it's taking a test or participating in a club or event.

Tipsheet
A piece of paper reads Student Loan Application.

Loans for U.S. Study

Loans can help cover U.S. study costs for those who don’t receive enough funding from scholarships or savings. Could a student loan be right for you?

Personal Story
A smiling woman looks off in the distance. Behind her is a sign that says "We all smile in the same language" with images of children with and without disabilities.

The Value of Student Exchanges to Developing Countries — and the U.S.

When students travel to another country to study as part of an exchange program, the benefits don’t just accrue to the individual student — communities across borders gain from the experience.

USAID funds student exchanges between institutions in developing countries and U.S. colleges and universities. The students who come to the U.S. gain knowledge and skills they can use back home, which in the long run can result in higher employment, enhanced productivity and a stronger economy in their home country.

Best Practice
About two dozen Bangladeshi men and women stand in a room before a projector screen

Creating a Culture of Inclusion: One EducationUSA Adviser’s Quest

Sausan Rahmatullah has always enjoyed volunteering. So when she heard that an organization in her home of Dhaka, Bangladesh was hosting a scholarship competition for high-achieving Bangladeshi students with physical disabilities, she immediately volunteered as a judge.

Having been introduced to so many talented students with disabilities through the volunteer experience, Sausan felt compelled to do more. Fortunately, the answer was right up her alley.

Tipsheet
Illustrated collage of world landmark postage stamps and luggage tags with text: "Where do US citizens want to go? Where do international visitors to the US come from? Everywhere!" with list of world regions

Infographic: Ask NCDE!

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by Mobility International USA, NCDE is your free resource to start you on your journey. Get to know us!

Tip: Download the accessible infographic under Documents or view on Flickr.

Tipsheet
A high school girl wearing a headscarf and sitting in a wheelchair rides the lift to board a yellow school bus.

Study at a U.S. High School

"American school is so neat," signs Belvion, a Deaf exchange student from Mozambique who communicates using sign language. "They've got libraries and computers and the teachers are great. I'm loving it."

Belvion is one of the many high school students with disabilities who come to the United States every year to live and study on an exchange program. Are you ready to be an exchange student too?

Personal Story
Stephanie stands at the Great Wall of China path holding her white cane.

A Ripple Starts in China

Later, the two ran into one of her partner’s friends. Stephanie was walking with her cane, and her partner explained to the friend how and why Stephanie used it. Stephanie was delighted to let her partner do the talking.

“She repeated everything I had just told her. I was so excited—the ripple had started.”

Books/Journals/Podcasts
Graphic of two postage stamps depicting African continent and United States

A World Awaits You: Spotlight on Sub-Saharan Africa

Welcome to the online A World Awaits You (AWAY) journal on people with disabilities traveling with a purpose.

We invite you to take a journey with us through this issue of A World Awaits You and to think about how studying, researching, interning or volunteering in Sub-Saharan Africa — or coming from this region as a visitor to the United States — will shape your own contributions.

Personal Story
Chart in graduation regalia

Accessing U.S. Studies to Advance Disability Rights in Thailand

Chart traveled to the United States from Thailand to get a Master's Degree in International Public Policy and Management from the University of Southern California (USC) with the support of the Ford Foundation’s International Fellowships Program (IFP). At the time, he just wanted to get the top-notch education that the American system would open up for him. Just what he would do with that master’s degree would come later.

Having grown up as a blind man in a small town about three hours from Bangkok, Chart knew what it was like to live in a place with limited resources.

Tipsheet

Students with Disabilities, by Program and Disability Type

YES Students with Disabilities by Disability Type (2007-2016), as shown on a pie chart.

44% Deaf/HOH
35% Blind/Low Vision
19% Physical Disability 
20% Non-apparent 

FLEX Students with Disabilities by Disability Type (2007-2016), as shown on a pie chart.

59% Physical Disability 
8% Deaf/HOH
4% Non-apparent 
29% Blind/Low Vision

Tipsheet

FLEX and YES Students with Disabilities Combined, by Disability Type

Total Number of Students by Disability Type (2007-2016)

  • 40% Physical Disability 
  • 32% Blind/ Low Vision 
  • 25% Deaf/HOH
  • 2% Non-apparent

Students with Physical Disabilities

  • 37% Cerebral Palsy 
  • 11% Scoliosis 
  • 7% Short Stature 
  • 8% Amputee 
  • 3% Spina Bifida 
  • 1% Polio 
  • 1% Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 
  • 32% Other 

Pages