Resource Library

Tip Sheets
At the airport bag screener

Air Travel Tips for Autistic Passengers

If you've been to an airport before, you know that the variety of sounds, lights, and touch at the airport can result in sensory overload! Here's some tips on getting through security, and the bumps of the flight.

Tip Sheets
A young American woman walks along a beach with a dog.

While You're Abroad: Tips by and for Autistic Travelers

Getting ready to land in your final destination? Take some advice from international exchange alumni on the autism spectrum about what they did overseas to make the transition abroad more smooth - and what they wish they had done.

Tip Sheets
A young American man with autism presents to a classroom of Jamaican children.

What Should I Expect in an Exchange Program?

After doing some research and talking to his college study abroad advisor, Jeremiah Swisher learned that there are many different types of international exchange opportunities to choose from. "The group trip to teach in Jamaica over spring break seemed like the best fit for me because it wouldn't interrupt my schoolwork," he says."The idea of traveling with a group of people was much more comfortable than traveling alone."

How you decide which kind of exchange program depends on you and your preferences. What type of international experience would you prefer?

Tip Sheets
A Bahraini man in cultural dress stands with an American man.

Cultural Differences in the U.S. and Abroad

Part of the wonders of traveling include experiencing other people's cultures, including their habits, values, interests, beliefs, and preferences. It takes time for any traveler to learn and adjust to differences in the host culture, and autistic travelers may want to research some specific ways in which the local host culture might impact their routines or preferences. Think about how you might adapt if you traveled to a country that had major cultural differences related to time and punctuality, leisure and schedules, and body language.

Tip Sheets
Distant view of a man standing on oceanside boulders with arms outstretched

"Why I'm Glad I Went Abroad": Autistic Travelers Share Top 10 Reasons

Are you eager to get foreign language immersion and to gain new skills for problem-solving and independent living? We asked several students on the autism spectrum to talk about the benefits they gained from studying abroad. Consider the many ways in which international exchange can enrich your life.

Tip Sheets
A girl smiles in mid-year at a point overlooking a city in Italy.

Disability Disclosure 101

Do I have to disclose my disability?

Short Answer: No, you are not required to disclose your disability when you apply for or at any point in an international exchange program. If you do not need specific accommodations, you can choose not to disclose your disability.

Long Answer: If you require accommodations or other types of support that will facilitate your success in an international exchange program, you will likely need to disclose your disability. Many exchange program policies require documentation of a disability in order to provide specific accommodations.

Tip Sheets
A caucasian American man talks to a classroom of Chinese female students.

Getting the Conversation Started: Learning Disabilities

Ask detailed questions that help you understand the full nature of the program and the resources you need to fully participate. While international exchange staff may know more about the programmatic details and international contexts, disability-related staff may have more ideas about alternative accommodation possibilities that could add insight to the discussion. 

Tip Sheets
A magnifying glass is held to a document labeled "visa."

Visa Considerations for Exchange Participants with Disabilities

Most international exchange participants are issued a J-1 or F-1 visa in order to enter the United States. Most of the rules and regulations for visas are the same for participants with or without disabilities, but there are also some additional considerations that people with disabilities should know. Find out how visa regulations may be impacted by a chronic illness, a pre-existing health condition, or personal assistance.

Tip Sheets
A young American woman seated on a yak signs "I love you" in sign language.

Disability Culture Around the World

The experience of traveling to a different country can result in “culture shock” for anyone, disability or not! You might also experience an additional layer of cultural adjustment related to attitudes around disability. As an American traveler with a disability, you may experience positive and negative cultural disability differences.

Tip Sheets
Rocks and sand are positioned in a zen garden.

What are Learning Disabilities?

Learning disability is an umbrella term used to describe a wide range of information processing disorders that affects learning. People with learning disabilities may have difficulties with reading, math, writing, spatial orientation or other skills that are not caused by or related to another condition or disability.

Tip Sheets
A young woman sits atop a wooly yak with a lake and mountains in the background.

Disability-Specific Preparations: From Fatigue to Sensitivities

Use these at-a-glance tips for going abroad with specific chronic health or systemic health conditions, such as chronic fatigue to environmental sensitivities and more. Don't forget to browse our resource library for more detailed advice on many of these topics!

Tip Sheets
A young woman wearing a neck support excitedly points at an elephant from a safari car.

10 Tips to Prepare for the Journey

From health care coverage to stress-busters, prepare for issues that might arise when traveling with a chronic health condition.

Tip Sheets
A young American woman in a crowded market in Japan.

Chronic Health Conditions & Planning for Your International Exchange

"Being disabled doesn't mean I have to give up on my dreams," explains Emily Block, who studied abroad in over a dozen countries on the Semester at Sea program, all while managing a rare chronic health condition.

As a person with a chronic or acute health condition, also known as systemic disability, you have the right to apply for the same kinds of life-changing experiences overseas as everyone else!

Tip Sheets
Rainbow and castle behind a young man

Autism & International Exchange Tips for Travelers

Have you ever felt like an anthropologist, having to figure out the social habits of those around you? Have you ever had to find new ways to communicate with other people, or had to interpret the slang or figures of speech used by other people? These can be common experiences for people on the autism spectrum, but they are also very common experiences for international exchange travelers! Why not be both?

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