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Tip Sheets
An American exchange participant talks with two young female students.

Professional Exchanges

Professional exchanges, such as internships and fellowships, provide opportunities for international visitors to gain career experience or to share their knowledge or skills while living in a particular country. These exchanges can last from a few weeks to a few years.

Tip Sheets
A young American woman in a power wheelchair in a busy square in an Asian city.

Find Your Exchange Experience

Americans with disabilities are becoming international explorers through exchange opportunities that include both people with and without disabilities. All U.S.-based international exchange organizations are required to make their programs inclusive of people with disabilities.

Focus on programs that best fit your interests, academic goals, and professional aspirations. These include academic study abroad programs, fellowships, professional development programs, internships, and volunteer opportunities abroad.

Tip Sheets
A blind man sits near a flower-filled landscape.

List of Funded Exchange Programs to the U.S.

Whether you're interested in leadership experience, disability issues, or other topics, consider applying for one of these competitive programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and other organizations. Most programs include full or partial funding!

Tip Sheets
A group of male international college students communicate in sign language. One wears a Gallaudet t-shirt.

Finding the Right College or University for You

Any college or university is a potential match for an international student or scholar with a disability. Learn which factors to consider when browsing institutions, and follow next steps for applying to your dream school.

Tip Sheets
MIUSA delegate by the Dead Sea in Jordan

Where Should I Go Abroad? Well, it Depends

The criteria of what makes a place a good fit for someone with a disability is also what makes a place good for someone without a disability. However, for many people with disabilities, this question taps into fundamental issues of rights and personal choice.

You have the right to study in an historic town with cobblestones that make for a bumpy wheelchair ride or a world famous city like Bangkok where the traffic patterns seemingly pose a risk for someone who is blind. People with disabilities live in every community, so there is no “best country”.

Tip Sheets
Low slope ramp with double handrails and tactile surface

Which U.S. School or University is Best to Place a Student with a Disability?

A qualified student, regardless of where the student is living when applying, cannot be refused admissions based on disability or anticipated accommodation needs.

Most disability service staff on campus or in the school district and disability organizations in the community can locate and provide what is needed for the student though it may take time, funds, and energy to find a good match for the student in regards to accommodation needs. The student may want to choose schools based on what is already available on campus and in the community.

Tip Sheets
A small group of people are seated in a boat on a river. Most are people of color wearing dress common to Bangladesh. A white man with grey hair sits to the far right.

International Exchange for Late-Career Professionals

Before you begin your search, consider:

  • Type of experience. Are you interested in conducting academic research? Service-learning/volunteering? Sharing your expertise with a local community?
  • Length of program. Would a short-term program (ranging from a few weeks to a few months) be ideal, or are you interested in a longer-term experience (6-24 months)?

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