Resource Library

Tip Sheets
Group of students standing and some sitting on table working together.

Supporting Exchange Participants with Bulimia or Anorexia

An international exchange program can involve a change in nutritional routines, causing symtoms of Bulimia and Anorexia to develop or to spin out of control. It is possible though for participants with Bulimia or Anorexia to successfully complete international exchange, whether they come into the program with a diagnosed condition or if they develop symptoms after departure.

Personal Stories
Linea (right) with a group of Indian community mental health workers

Real World Experiences in Mental Health

Most recently, Linea spent a week in Kerala, India, observing a local community mental health team, which was coordinated through Linea’s mental health advocacy mentor.

“I had never been to a developing nation before, and I went in with my American mindset that perhaps there was something that I could teach them. Perhaps there was, but I learned so much from them.”

Tip Sheets
Power wheelchair user with breathing machine seeks assistance from another person.

Tips on Traveling with a Ventilator or Breathing Machine

When traveling internationally, you may need electrical converters/adaptors for respiratory equipment. Also airline personnel may request detailed information about its operation and use. Know your settings and how to do basic setup and problem-solving, and learn other tips for traveling safely.

Personal Stories
Paul Monroe graduating from University of Cambridge

Health Matters Abroad

Once he made the decision to go, traveling from the United States to the United Kingdom for graduate study in technology policy seemed fairly straightforward for Paul Monroe – until it came time to figure out how two different health systems would cover the same (expensive!) treatments he used back home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Navigating local educational institutions, health care systems, or border customs are not always easy to understand. Differences in treatments, rules about importing medications, and varying definitions of disability can compound the confusion.

Personal Stories
Jack Godwin with statue of father-son Bulgarian writers Petko and Pencho Slaveykov

Lifetime Connections as a Fulbright Alumnus

Dr. Jack Godwin has made international education his life mission. He is changing the assumption that it’s just about one study abroad experience as an undergraduate. Throughout his professional career as a university administrator, he has participated in the U.S. Department of State-sponsored J. William Fulbright Program to different countries every few years.

While an international experience is voluntary, he finds those who choose it to be most interesting.

Tip Sheets
African American man in a manual wheelchair strolls along with others in Japan

What To Do When Insurance Doesn't Cover It

Participants who receive funding for a personal assistant through Medicaid or other government support are not able to use that funding once outside their home country. Travel insurance companies typically do not pay for personal assistants for daily care overseas or durable medical equipment that is not related to a first occurrence of an illness or injury overseas.

Since these costs are unlikely to be covered for people with existing needs, exchange programs or institutions should work with a participant to cover the costs.

Tip Sheets
A woman in a red suitcoat listens intently to another woman talking

Health Insurance: 8 Steps for Exchange Advisors to Take

By removing health insurance barriers, you can support diverse students to safely participate in your international exchange programs.With these options in place, it shouldn’t prevent qualified individuals from participating in exchanges and alleviate some of the difficult health cost issues that exchange staff and students need to deal with during the program.

Tip Sheets
Two people in conversation near railing of a ship on the ocean, photographed from above. The young man is seated in a wheelchair.

Does Medicaid or Medicare Cover Me Abroad?

If you are a Medicaid recipient, you may be dropped from enrollment in the medical plans if you do not keep a U.S. state residence or address or if you lose your SSI eligibility (see our tipsheet on "SSI, SSDI & International Exchange" for more). Loss of enrollment creates a gap of coverage upon return home from traveling abroad, especially if the travel health insurance does not cover you in your home country.

Tip Sheets
Woman getting henna painted on the palm of her hand

Why Pre-Existing Conditions Matter in Insurance

Plans offered to international exchange participants for less than a year of coverage are not fully licensed products so changes to U.S. health laws through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) do not apply. These plans can increase costs, have pre-existing condition exclusions, or deny enrollment to an individual based on health status.

Tip Sheets
A young woman sits atop a wooly yak with a lake and mountains in the background.

Disability-Specific Preparations: From Fatigue to Sensitivities

Use these at-a-glance tips for going abroad with specific chronic health or systemic health conditions, such as chronic fatigue to environmental sensitivities and more. Don't forget to browse our resource library for more detailed advice on many of these topics!

Tip Sheets
A young American woman in a crowded market in Japan.

Chronic Health Conditions & Planning for Your International Exchange

"Being disabled doesn't mean I have to give up on my dreams," explains Emily Block, who studied abroad in over a dozen countries on the Semester at Sea program, all while managing a rare chronic health condition.

As a person with a chronic or acute health condition, also known as systemic disability, you have the right to apply for the same kinds of life-changing experiences overseas as everyone else!

Tip Sheets
A young woman wears a Vietnamese-style hat while paddling in a canoe.

15 Ways to Accommodate Exchange Participants with Chronic Health Conditions

“If I expect the program to fully include me, then I need to provide them with as much information as possible," says Betsy Valnes, who has a brain injury and has participated in several overseas programs. "In my experience, people are more understanding about my need to excuse myself for a while if they know my reasons for fatigue." 

Tip Sheets
Study Abroad students including one who is blind pose with their hard hats on at the bottom of a waterfall in Costa Rica they ziplined by.

Is Your Exchange Program Safe?

Reputable exchange programs should have health, safety, security and risk management plans in place. When deciding on a program or assessing it after you are accepted, ask questions about plans for crises or emergencies abroad and how information about your disability will be shared and accommodated in a crisis event.

Tip Sheets
Close up of two people with one person supporting the other

Ups & Downs of International Travel

Managing your mental health while studying abroad – whether or not you have a history of anxiety, depression, or other mental health conditions – is something every person must think about when going abroad.

Being away from usual stress at home can sometimes be a relief when abroad; experiencing new adventures can be a useful distraction. You will also have times when you feel confused, uncomfortable, annoyed, and many of the same emotions that you manage in your daily life at home.