Resource Library

Tipsheet
Two people who are looking to use a CCTV

Assistive Technology for Blind or Low Vision Participants

What technology is preferred or needed depends on previous training or the type and amount of visual content that is being accessed. Computer proficiency is expected for a variety of tasks, and by using adaptive software, such as audio screen-readers, standard computers can be made much more accessible. Accessing books and other printed materials in an accessible format also can be done using braille-related technology or magnifying equipment, some of which are portable.

Tipsheet
African health clinic

Medications When Traveling Internationally

You know your own medication dosages and medical history the best. So, it's up to you to research how to manage your medications when traveling outside your country. Talk with your home doctor and insurance company who can answer questions. In some cases, you may have an international travel clinic or travel insurance providers to consult.

Personal Story
Tatiana gardening with another international exchange student

Deaf Student Has the Best of Both Worlds

A Deaf student from Russia, Tatiana experienced the best of both worlds by attending two schools during her Future Leaders Exchange (FLEX) year in the United States.

She attended the Delaware School for the Deaf (DSD) for the first five months of her exchange program while taking pre-calculus at Christiana High School, a mainstream public high school. After five months attending DSD, she transitioned to Christiana full time. 

News
Megan Smith (right) and a colleague, both who use wheelchairs, look at eachother - photo by www.kiefelphotography.com

MIUSA & Rotary Propels New Leaders

Megan Smith began her involvement with MIUSA when she was just 15. “Staff  helped advise me on going abroad on a volunteer program in Costa Rica and Peru,” says Megan, who is a power wheelchair user. “Then, while at university, I spoke at MIUSA conferences and wrote some pieces about my international experiences.” Now, after three years working in the MIUSA office and leading MIUSA leadership exchanges, Megan will head to her next big adventure at the year's end.

News
A MIUSA delegation of women with and without disabilities pose for a photo in Jordan

MIUSA Alumni Paving the Way for Deaf Rights in the Philippines

Our work at MIUSA brings people together to activate ideas, plans of action, and partnerships that expand beyond the life-time of the program or project. There’s a global community collectively fighting against poverty, illiteracy, discrimination, violence, and unemployment. People connected with MIUSA are an important part of this community, and you never know where you’ll find us.

Personal Story
Lizzie Kiama (right) and a friend wear helemts and smile for a photo

What Makes One Take Action?

How do short term international exchanges advance equal rights for people with disabilities? It starts with an individual taking action.

For Lizzie Kiama, a disabled activist from Kenya, an afternoon spent on a YMCA basketball court in Oregon, USA, gave rise to a new idea. “This was when my dream for Women & Wheels was born,” says Kiama who has a physical disability. “I had the opportunity to take part in Wheelchair Rugby, and I knew I had to play the sport again.”

Personal Story
Stone arches of bridge or acquaduct in Italy

Going with the Flow in Florence

Talking through her concerns with others helped study abroad student Amanda let go of her anxieties over the summer she spent in Florence, Italy.

Tipsheet
People being pulled in rickshaws in Asia

Preparations for Travel with Mental Health Conditions

Studying or volunteering abroad can open not just new adventures and cultures to you, but lessons that give you new perspectives even after returning home. Appreciating the moment. Accepting new ways of doing things. Finding your personal drive or independence. These are all what exchange alumni living with mental health conditions say are ways they grew while abroad.

Tipsheet
A young woman in a manual wheelchair bends over to dip water out of a low pool to wash her hands in Japan

Preparations for Travel with a Physical Disability

Get everything you need in place so you can start your adventure right as soon as you land. This includes finding solutions to inaccessible places, learning new strategies, and preparing for differences.

Tipsheet
Group of diverse American exchange students smile at the camera

10 Steps to a Universally Designed Exchange Program

The time put in upfront to rethink what makes a program inclusive benefits more than just participants with disabilities. It also means less need for retrofitting or scrambling to put in place individual accommodations later on. Universal design encourages flexibility and proactive planning, and bonus: you will be protecting yourself from surprises by creating a program that is suited for all.

Tipsheet
Person writing while another watches on

Crafting Health History & Medical Clearance Forms

 

Some international programs make it a policy to include a confidential health history and clearance form signed by a medical provider and/or an accommodation request form in the acceptance packet sent to each participant. These forms encourage the individual to talk with the medical provider about what is needed while on the program, and allows participants the option to disclose disability information and request accommodations they may require while abroad with the program staff.

Tipsheet
Close up photo of an American young man smiling

Disclosure and Building Trust

To encourage participants to disclose a disability, exchange providers must take steps to create a welcoming, supportive, judgment-free environment. Your office should be upfront regarding the use of medical and disability related information that may otherwise be confidential or private.

The person with a disability wants information and answers to questions that directly relate to their situation, BUT:

Tipsheet
Group of students in an international park, one uses a wheelchair

10 Recruitment Tips to Attract People with Disabilities

You want more people with disabilities in your international programs but they are not applying! What can you do to encourage more participation? Here's 10 ways to boost interest and ensure they not only apply but make it through the process to participate.

Blog
A group of students with disabilities in a garden

Disability is Diversity

Look at your mission statements, non-discrimination policy, or other institutional guidelines, and you are likely to see disability mentioned alongside other aspects of diversity such as racial, gender, or religious equity, and for good reason. Having a diverse community benefits everyone by introducing a wide variety of viewpoints, encouraging open-mindedness, and creating dynamic environments.

Tipsheet
An advisor talks to a young woman with a disability

Protecting and Sharing Disability Information

Conversations about an exchange participant's disability and/or disability-related accommodations should be done in a confidential setting. Only information from those conversations should be shared with others when they have a need to know.

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